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Sanjib.A
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Cheaper than TI's launchpad!
Sanjib.A   6/9/2014 12:50:23 PM
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So, this one might be the cheapest development kit available in the market? I would really appreciate TI, the company which started this trend of making cute little development kits available at lower price. I still have a MSP430 kit having shape and size of a USB thumb drive which had a price tag of $20. I got that one 3/4 years back from a conference for free. The launchpad costed $5. I think, these kits are still among favourites for engineers.Why these boards did not gain enough publicity as Raspberry Pi, Arduino?...may be because of the lack of a bigger or rather a broader community of users, forums? ...and the absence of a pool of available resources, those are easily available for Arduino, Raspberry Pi?

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Cheaper than TI's launchpad!
Max The Magnificent   6/9/2014 12:55:13 PM
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@Sanjib: Why these boards did not gain enough publicity as Raspberry Pi, Arduino?...may be because of the lack of a bigger community of users, forums?

It's hard to say why some things take off and others not-so-much -- I'm sure that the Arduino was slow-going at first.

TonyTib
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Re: Cheaper than TI's launchpad!
TonyTib   6/9/2014 1:55:51 PM
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The TI Launchpads do have a decent (thought not Arduino) sized community, for exmaple, check out 43oh.com and the Energia IDE.

There are a number of other cheap 32-bit dev boards, such as the TI Tiva LaunchPads ($13 & $20) and ST's Nucleo boards (~$10), although right now I can't think of any others for <$5.

 

betajet
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Please don't ask me about sports :-)
betajet   6/9/2014 2:46:19 PM
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The NXP LPCXpresso boards -- which have been around for a number of years -- have that sort of snap-off layout, i.e., a USB-based debugger on the left and a demo MCU on the right with DIP layout for the signals.  However, the LPCXpresso board I have isn't set up for "snap off" -- I'd have to "saw off" with my fine-toothed razor saw.

The LPCXpresso boards are priced in the US$20-30 range depending on which demo MCU is on the DIP side.  Usually it's a tiny ARM M0/M0+ like an LPC1100 or LPC800.  What drives up the price is that the USB debug SoC is an LPC3154, a serious CPU with 180 MHz ARM926EJ-S, 192KB SRAM, 16KB instruction and data caches, and MMU.  Way overkill compared to the tiny USB controller on the Cypress boards.

Interesting note on the LPC3154: it doesn't have any on-board flash memory, so LPCXpresso has to boot up over USB each time you plug it in.

Wnderer
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That is cheap
Wnderer   6/9/2014 3:01:37 PM
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That is cheap considering that the USB-Serial bridge on the little board $2.60 for the one piece price and the 4100 processor is $3 and the 4200 processor is $3:40.

photonic
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Re: Cheaper than TI's launchpad!
photonic   6/9/2014 3:52:06 PM
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They are charging $7.50 to ship in US. So real cost of part is $8.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Cheaper than TI's launchpad!
Max The Magnificent   6/9/2014 4:02:03 PM
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@barfoo0: They are charging $7.50 to ship in US. So real cost of part is $8

I hadn't thought about the postage (shipping and handling) -- although that would apply to other boards also -- but if they are changing $7.40 to ship, then wouldn't the full price be $4 + $7:50 = $11.50?  (Where did you get $8 from)

betajet
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Re: Cheaper than TI's launchpad!
betajet   6/9/2014 4:13:46 PM
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barfoo0 wrote: They are charging $7.50 to ship in US.

Try Digi-Key.  They quote me $3.22 for USPS First Class, and only charge $3.99 :-) plus sales tax for the board.

photonic
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Re: Cheaper than TI's launchpad!
photonic   6/9/2014 4:16:13 PM
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I was estimating that the actual shipping cost would be on the order of $3.50 via US post given the smallness of the board.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Cheaper than TI's launchpad!
Max The Magnificent   6/9/2014 4:20:20 PM
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@barfoo0: I was estimating that the actual shipping cost would be on the order of $3.50...

Ah -- I see -- I misunderstood -- sorry

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