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antedeluvian
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Bet you haven't got this...
antedeluvian   6/11/2014 8:24:42 PM
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David

Great collection! Let me show you something I'll bet you don't have. Made by my previous employer (Weidmuller) it is an attachement that fits onto a screwdriver blade that allows you to snip a wire without putting the screwdriver down. It is called a "Swifty". Because it probably violates some DIN standard because it will nick wire strands, you are not supposed to use it to strip wire, but it is just as effective as using side-cutters. Just don't use it for inspected work.

To be honest I have found it a little less useful that its original promise, but it surely should appear as an addendum to your list.

David Ashton
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Re: Bet you haven't got this...
David Ashton   6/12/2014 5:18:01 AM
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No I haven't got one.  But I would like one!   It would be very handy when you have an 80-way cable to terminate on a terminal block!

boblespam
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Re: Bet you haven't got this...
boblespam   6/12/2014 8:04:46 AM
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I don't like tools that make cutting wires too easy: they tend to cut the wires too short ! For sure, the tool is responsible, not the user. (and there's no tool to elongate a short wire)

Yog-Sothoth
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Re: Bet you haven't got this...
Yog-Sothoth   6/12/2014 9:00:26 AM
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I still have a 'Bib Wire Stripper & Cutter'. Made in England by Multicore Solder in probably about 1966 when I was just 10. It still cuts and strips wires and if I recall right, cost 3 shillings and sixpence (about a dime for you in the USA). You can't have enough tools IMHO!

David Ashton
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Re: Bet you haven't got this...
David Ashton   6/12/2014 6:07:49 PM
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@Yog - I remember the name Bib.  Can you post a picture (I almsot never can but others seem to manage it.....)

MeasurementBlues
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Re: Bet you haven't got this...
MeasurementBlues   6/12/2014 12:48:11 PM
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This tool pulls and cuts cable ties. Dad also left me a coffee can full of them. I used a few the other day to ties an outsdie cable to a downspout. Not the cable doesn't band against the spout in the wind.



antedeluvian
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screwdriver with screw holder
antedeluvian   6/11/2014 8:30:57 PM
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David

I used to have another very good screwdriver that boasted a spring-loaded grip that held the screw onto the blade, but alas that got lost during a move. I've yet to find one that works for Philips screws...

I find these are pretty common. I have two from Weidmuller. Just google "screwdriver with screw holder". Here is one with an explanation of how it works.

David Ashton
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Re: screwdriver with screw holder
David Ashton   6/12/2014 4:46:01 AM
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@antedeluvian....the one in your video clip is made by Wiha (I think German?) and is very natty.  My lost one is similar to these ones

 Fairly simple - as you push the holding bit the clip expands and then you retract it to grip the screw head.

I have magnetised a lot of my screwdrivers but this usually does not work too well - screws tend to come off very easily and something more positive - like the ones shown - is required.

MeasurementBlues
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Re: screwdriver with screw holder
MeasurementBlues   6/12/2014 12:29:38 PM
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@Antedeluvian

You may recall that last year on The Connecting Edge, I ran a blog called "My Father's Toolbox." Here's a photo of a screwdriver that holds a screw.



antedeluvian
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Re: screwdriver with screw holder
antedeluvian   6/12/2014 12:31:30 PM
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Martin

You may recall that last year on The Connecting Edge, I ran a blog called "My Father's Toolbox."

I do recall. Was it only last year?

MeasurementBlues
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Re: screwdriver with screw holder
MeasurementBlues   6/12/2014 12:37:33 PM
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Antedeluvian,

I posted it on June 26, 2013. I still have access to the entire post,but it's no longer public. But I could repost it here in EET. Or I can post some of the 17 images as comments here, like this one.



antedeluvian
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Re: screwdriver with screw holder
antedeluvian   6/12/2014 1:00:44 PM
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martin

I posted it on June 26, 2013

I seem to remember a subsequent blog, where you posted a mystery object (or objects) much like David has done in this blog.

MeasurementBlues
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Re: screwdriver with screw holder
MeasurementBlues   6/12/2014 1:08:01 PM
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Antedeluvian, you might be referring to this:

 


Is this some kind of scoring tool for making a line on metal? Yes, that's a wheel on the end.

David Ashton
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Gnarled screw....
David Ashton   6/12/2014 5:06:48 AM
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A correction - on page 4 between the first and second pictures please read knurled screw (not gnarled).  Max and I are gnarled (def: knobbly, rough, and twisted, especially with age) - though Max may take issue with this - but that adjusting screw is knurled (def: having a rough surface that can be gripped).  Apologies for the error.

zeeglen
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Re: Gnarled screw....
zeeglen   6/12/2014 9:35:34 AM
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@ David - a bit (NPI) hard to see in the photo, but it looks like at least a couple of those bits are Robertson (square)?

One aspect of tool acquisition that the novice must learn is suitability for the job at hand.  Just 2 evenings ago my stepson asked if I had a 3/4" (~19mm) wrench so he could install a new temperature sensor into his vehicle motor - he has never attempted this sort of activity before, and the local auto parts emporium had just done a readout on his vehicle computer port that indicated a faulty sensor.  He was under the impression all one had to do was grab a wrench and go to it.

I warned him that using the wrong tool such as an open end wrench or a 12 point socket could bug up the existing sensor hex portion so that to remove it would require removing the entire motor to get at it.

After we located the temperature sensor buried deep under the pipes and hoses we had to go out and purchase a deep 6 point hex socket of the right length to allow the ratchet to fit between 2 pipes using a 1/2" to 3/8" drive adapter. He learned that a tool collection can be built up over the years as each job asks for just the right tool.

David Ashton
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Re: Gnarled screw....
David Ashton   6/12/2014 6:29:41 PM
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@Zeeglen - I think there are a couple of square bits in the big set soemwhere.   A couple of years ago I bought some packs of wood screws at a give-away price in a hardware store.  When I got them home I found they were square drive and i did not (then) have any drivers for them.  But imagine my joy when I found that each bag contained a driver bit.  I only bought two bags - wish now I had bought more!

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Gnarled screw....
Max The Magnificent   6/13/2014 9:26:50 AM
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@David: Max and I are gnarled (def: knobbly, rough, and twisted, especially with age) - though Max may take issue with this - but that adjusting screw is knurled (def: having a rough surface that can be gripped).

In that case I qualify as being both gnarled and knurled! :-)

Max The Magnificent
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If the shoe fits...
Max The Magnificent   6/12/2014 9:30:17 AM
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@David: "you should see her collection of earrings"

Forget the earrings -- you should see my wife's collection of shoes!!!

Max The Magnificent
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What are you waffling on about man!
Max The Magnificent   6/12/2014 9:31:02 AM
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@David: ...I got my wife one too, to help her with her beading, which in many ways is just as fiddly as electronics...

What are you waffling on about man! Who cares about beading?

David Ashton
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Re: What are you waffling on about man!
David Ashton   6/12/2014 6:12:55 PM
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@Max..."Who cares about beading?"   My wife does, she disappears into her sewing room for hours at a time and emerges with something fashionable and pretty.  It stops her complaining when I disappear into my workshop for hours at a time and emerge cussing and swearing that some !@#$%^& thing won't work.....

Actually I did a beading course with her.  It was easier than taking her there and collecting her a few hours later (she is disabled).  I was a star at putting things together but when I tried to pick colours that went well together all the other students (all women) would shake their heads sadly and say 'No, Dave, don't go there....."    So now I just help my wife put things together occsaionally (and she sometimes borrow some of my tools.....

Max The Magnificent
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Re: What are you waffling on about man!
Max The Magnificent   6/12/2014 6:18:46 PM
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@David: It stops her complaining when I disappear into my workshop for hours at a time...

Ah -- well played, sir!

TonyTib
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Re: What are you waffling on about man!
TonyTib   6/12/2014 6:28:14 PM
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@David: It stops her complaining when I disappear into my workshop for hours at a time...

@Max: Ah -- well played, sir!

That assumes your wife doesn't have double standards...

Max The Magnificent
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Who is that mysterious stranger?
Max The Magnificent   6/12/2014 9:31:43 AM
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@David: ...check out this column, which -- unfortunately -- didn't win me an oscilloscope

I'm not surprised -- it was written by some weird buy called Don Tavidash

David Ashton
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Re: Who is that mysterious stranger?
David Ashton   6/12/2014 6:24:46 PM
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Rats...outed at last.....

>"by some weird buy..."

He's not for sale.......

MeasurementBlues
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My Father's Toolbox
MeasurementBlues   6/12/2014 12:33:57 PM
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Last year on The Connecting Edge, I posted a slideshow called My Father's Toolbox. I kept all of his tools when I cleaned out his house after his passing. Here's a photo from that. This is my favorite tool set.



MeasurementBlues
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Re: My Father's Toolbox
MeasurementBlues   6/12/2014 12:43:23 PM
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Here are two screwdrivers with magnets. they work great for picking up steel screws. Brass, not so much.



David Ashton
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Re: My Father's Toolbox
David Ashton   6/12/2014 6:14:52 PM
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@MB - thanks for all the pics and comments.  I love the set of Xcelite nut drivers. (is that what you call them there??)   Please post more, or better still repost the whole article - I am sure many EET readers did not see it.

JeffL_2
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About the Gardner-Denver item
JeffL_2   6/12/2014 1:12:13 PM
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This outfit was known for making "wire-wrap" tools, and the tool shown is indeed a wire stripper for use in that system. It's not immediately clear to me exactly why there's a 1/4" discrepancy in strip length but it has something to do with wrap length being longer than strip length (don't know why it seems like this tool indicates the opposite so maybe there's more than one way of using the tool to explain the further discrepancy). I still have and use some of these tools because sometimes there are few options for prototyping today's ultra-dense chips without first getting a complete PCB, except for using adapters to get back to the 0.1" grid and then plugging in to a wrappable socket. The standard gauge for computer use is 30 but the lower gauge numbers were typically used in telephone central offices since the system was originally developed for Western Electric. You coulld probably do a fairly long photo spread just about all the wire strippers ever developed for this system, and the original hand tools were more frequently air-powered than electric.

I especially recall how challenging it was at the beginning of my career to create and maintain wire-wrap net lists before spreadsheets with at most the assistance of simple editors on minicomputers, and how hard it was to track down and find VCC-GND shorts in a whole rackful of backplanes thrown together in an absurd hurry using the "big bang" theory of debugging, in order to satisfy some manager's premise of a schedule "drop-dead date". I suppose it's even harder to do essentially the same thing at chip level but at least the tools to help you with this are a bit more accommodating nowadays!

betajet
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Re: About the Gardner-Denver item
betajet   6/12/2014 3:12:59 PM
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Maybe it's for "Modified Wire-Wrap".  That's where the WW tool wraps insulated wire around the post one or two times before it starts wrapping bare wire.  Besides looking cooler, modified wrap moves any nick in the wire where you stripped it away from where the wrap begins, making it less likely for the wire to break off.

David Ashton
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Re: About the Gardner-Denver item
David Ashton   6/12/2014 6:17:21 PM
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@JeffL - Many thanks.  Makes sense - I once put a bit of stripped Cat 6 wire in the 26 hole and could not get it out - had to pull it thru.  So I can see that with thinner wire wrap wire, you would put it thru to the point you wanted on the scale, then pull it back to strip it.  Is that how it worked?   Very clever.

betajet
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Use drill bit extension to make a long-handled screwdriver
betajet   6/12/2014 2:53:38 PM
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I occasionally need a really-long-handled screwdriver to reach a difficult screw.  One way to make this is to use a 1/4" drill extender such as this one: Irwin 12-inch Drill Bit Extension.  Just stick in your favorite 1/4" power screwdriver bit and "Bob's your uncle".

David Ashton
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Re: Use drill bit extension to make a long-handled screwdriver
David Ashton   6/12/2014 6:24:06 PM
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@Betajet...that's pertty handy, I think it would be more useful for screwdriving than as a drill extender - I see the hole has to be 5/8 or larger.

betajet
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Re: Use drill bit extension to make a long-handled screwdriver
betajet   6/12/2014 6:35:43 PM
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It's also great if your extension cord AKA "flex" is 12 inches too short :-)

Also also, if you need to drill a hole at an inside corner and the body of the drill forces you to drill the hole in at an angle, the extender gets you a smaller angle.

zeeglen
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Re: Use drill bit extension to make a long-handled screwdriver
zeeglen   6/12/2014 7:08:11 PM
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@ betajet I occasionally need a really-long-handled screwdriver to reach a difficult screw.

More than a few times a right-angled drill drive has got me out of a jam.  This is a heavy-duty nylon casting with a pair of bevelled gears that transfer the drill torque around a corner.  Just fit the bit into the 2nd chuck and drill the hole sideways.

David Ashton
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Re: Use drill bit extension to make a long-handled screwdriver
David Ashton   6/14/2014 2:24:39 AM
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@Zeeglen - you're getting aherad of me here.....as stated in the article, I'll be doing another one on making holes in things and this is one type of tool I was going to include.   Watch this space......

zeeglen
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Use around-the-corner drive for 90 degree torque shift
zeeglen   6/14/2014 11:10:52 AM
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@david OOps! Sorry..  But I think we might have found abother use for my 90 degree torque shift phaser.

Referring to an earlier post on this thread how we had to find just the right hex socket/adater/ratchet to get at my stepson's water temperature sensor, he managed to remove it easily.  While attempting to insert the new replacement he dropped it - it disappeared into the bowels of the engine, steering gear, rods and struts.  After a fruitless search and driving the vehicle back and forth with heavy braking hoping to shake it loose, it still was gone forever.

Just before we started, my overly enthusiastic stepson, always the optimist, had pronounced that this job would take only 5 minutes, then he could replace the spark plugs.  I chuckled silently to myself - there is NO 5 minute job when it comes to repairing your vehicle. My optimistic stepson was about to become an optimist with experience - aka a pessimist.

He had to purchase another $25 teperature sensor, this time he managed to install it without dropping it.  On to the spark plugs! ---

Sideways V6- (why his mother and older sister had ever chosen this big ugly SUV piece of crap  I'll never comprehend) - the rear 3 plugs are arranged so that one cannot get at them from the top, only from undernreath.  Up on a lift in a dealership not a problem for the mechanic ($150 to change your plugs), but with with the vehicle up on axlestands in a driveway one has to maintain a partial sit-up for the duration of plug removal and installation.  A real back killer unless you place a lot of pillows for back support.

This is where my around the corner torque 90 degree phaser might work - if we can maoeuver the socket onto a rear plug from above and drive the 90 degree shifter with a ratchet we just might be able change the rear plugs ourselves and for much cheaper.  Will let you know in a few days if this works; my mechanical 90 degree phaser is at work and will get it Monday.

David Ashton
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Re: Use around-the-corner drive for 90 degree torque shift
David Ashton   6/14/2014 7:50:27 PM
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@Zeeglen...been there...done very similar things.   A great illustration of how the right tool can make a job much easier.  And how car (and electronic equipment) manufacturers do their best to make life more difficult!

I suggest you teach your stepson the first rule of fixing stuff:

The first 90% of the job takes 90% of the time

The last 10% of the job takes the OTHER 90% of the time!

 

jimfordbroadcom
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I feel the same way...
jimfordbroadcom   7/3/2014 1:57:36 PM
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about your blogs as you do about Tool King, David.  That is, I love reading about and looking at all those cool tools, but I hate that I just wasted a good part of the morning here at work doing so!

Max The Magnificent
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Re: I feel the same way...
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2014 2:25:23 PM
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@jimford: ...I love reading about and looking at all those cool tools, but I hate that I just wasted a good part of the morning...

It's amazing how quickly the time goes by when you are reading one of David's blogs and thinking about your own equivalent tools...

David Ashton
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Re: I feel the same way...
David Ashton   7/3/2014 6:05:12 PM
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@Jim, Max I don't think I could get through a work day now without getting a "fix" of EET.  So if I am assisting you guys in doing the same.... Job Done!!!



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