Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
kfield
User Rank
Blogger
Drills not Dead
kfield   6/30/2014 1:06:36 PM
NO RATINGS
And there I was, hoping against hope that drills would become an evil implement of torture of the past. Sigh...

Ron Neale
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Three years for development and 10 years to prove it?
Ron Neale   6/25/2014 9:24:44 AM
NO RATINGS
Etmax:- Yes I suspect you might be right it is more likley to be a surface effect than the sort of repair that replaces a substantial part of the tooth. When we get the facts voltage, current, pulse shape, contact method etc. then we will be better equipped to comment further. What I think will be fascinating for us NV memory watchers is what is being driven in and the mechanism responsible for that movement. the quote from King's College site reads "By accelerating the natural process by which calcium and phosphate minerals re-enter the tooth to repair a defect, the device boosts the tooth's natural repair process". Mixing the repair with the natural process will require an explanation.

Etmax
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Three years for development and 10 years to prove it?
Etmax   6/25/2014 6:47:49 AM
NO RATINGS
Very interesting, my concerns wouldn't be things of reversed polarity, that's easily addressed, but more that teeth are very complex things with channels that allow fluid exchange between the nerve and exterior. What sort of streses are introduced when in stead of a thin layer of enamel is overlaid on dentine, a thick lump of enamel is used? Maybe it's only for small holes, or you go in for multi-stage treatment?

prabhakar_deosthali
User Rank
CEO
Re: Three years for development and 10 years to prove it?
prabhakar_deosthali   6/24/2014 3:48:28 AM
NO RATINGS
And what if the polarity gets reversed?  Will it demineralise instead of remineralising?

Too many what ifs to be answered before we sit in the dentist;s chair to get such a process done on our tooth.

jnissen
User Rank
Manager
Re: Three years for development and 10 years to prove it?
jnissen   6/23/2014 6:43:08 PM
NO RATINGS
Agree, Could be a new way for dentists to inflict pain! Try a little more amplitude for that bad attitude...

Ron Neale
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Three years for development and 10 years to prove it?
Ron Neale   6/23/2014 1:07:52 PM
NO RATINGS
With respect to your request "How long will it take to build the tooth?" I have today submitted a list of questions to the dental group at King's College. I hope the answers will provide our readers with some quantitative rather than qualitative information about the process, including the answer to your timing question.

SmokeNoMore
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Three years for development and 10 years to prove it?
SmokeNoMore   6/23/2014 12:42:02 PM
NO RATINGS
Very interesting research but, will it be commercially viable?  There're a few options for fillings today amalgam (silver/mercury), resin and other composites .  Most US dentists are moving away from amalgam for safety and cosmetic reasons.  A resin/composite filling can be color matched.  Basic fillings can be prepped and completed in about an hour.

How long will it take to build the tooth?  Will the process allow for color matching?  How will the cost compare to 'traditional' methods?  In the US, the insurance drives people to chose the option that is covered.  Insurance companies are slow to adopt new methods - most still consider composite fillings as 'extra'.  I'm sure there are folks that will pay not to have "plastic" or "metal" in their mouth.  Will that population be enough to help forge the commercial viability of this technology?

boblespam
User Rank
CEO
Re: Three years for development and 10 years to prove it?
boblespam   6/23/2014 11:31:53 AM
NO RATINGS
The drill is there to prepare the damaged zone. With this new process, we still need to prepare the damaged zone, so the DRILL IS NOT DEAD AAAAAH HA HA ! (diabolical laugh)

Sheetal.Pandey
User Rank
Manager
Re: Three years for development and 10 years to prove it?
Sheetal.Pandey   6/23/2014 2:40:22 AM
NO RATINGS
As this is work in progress, more details will follow and surely they must have involved eperienced dentist and surgeons in this invention. I got my teeth drilled yesrs back and it pains so much. Will this process be less painful as compared to the conventional one.

Ron Neale
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Three years for development and 10 years to prove it?
Ron Neale   6/22/2014 8:30:42 AM
NO RATINGS
_hm:- Yes you make a good point, nerve damage has to be a consideration, I think it will depend on the mechanism. If it is electromigration then I would expect there would be current localization and high current density at the point on the surface of the tooth where the new material (mineral/clacium) is being driven in and much lower along the return path. If the mechanism is more plating like (electro-chemical) then the current density over a large area of the tooth surface would expected to be lower. Until we get the facts we have to consider the possibility,(continuing my NV memory analogy) that they have created a lateral structure wiith some sort of coaxial electrode where only current across the surface of the tooth is involved. Here is a speculative figure.

 

 

Page 1 / 2   >   >>


Top Comments of the Week
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
<b><a href=Betajet">

The Circle – The Future's Imperfect in the Present Tense
Betajet
5 comments
The Circle, a satirical, dystopian novel published in 2013 by San Francisco-based writer Dave Eggers, is about a large, very powerful technology company that combines aspects of Google, ...

Max Maxfield

Recommended Reads From the Engineer's Bookshelf
Max Maxfield
27 comments
I'm not sure if I read more than most folks or not, but I do I know that I spend quite a lot of time reading. I hate to be idle, so I always have a book or two somewhere about my person -- ...

Martin Rowe

Make This Engineering Museum a Reality
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
Vincent Valentine is a man on a mission. He wants to make the first house to ever have a telephone into a telephone museum. Without help, it may not happen.

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
16 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Special Video Section
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.
Recently formed Architects of Modern Power consortium ...
Specially modified Corvette C7 Stingray responds to ex Indy ...
Avago’s ACPL-K30T is the first solid-state driver qualified ...
NXP launches its line of multi-gate, multifunction, ...
Doug Bailey, VP of marketing at Power Integrations, gives a ...
See how to ease software bring-up with DesignWare IP ...
DesignWare IP Prototyping Kits enable fast software ...
This video explores the LT3086, a new member of our LDO+ ...
In today’s modern electronic systems, the need for power ...