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resistion
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Re: Use?
resistion   7/7/2014 6:53:09 PM
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Of course there's been work to get around this but it's not standard FRAM.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Use?
Max The Magnificent   7/7/2014 5:18:51 PM
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@resistion: The read checks polarization by monitoring a particular write operation. When the polarization has been flipped, the original state has to be written back.

Wow -- I learn something new every day -- thanks for sharing.

resistion
User Rank
CEO
Re: Use?
resistion   7/7/2014 5:12:11 PM
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The read checks polarization by monitoring a particular write operation. When the polarization has been flipped, the original state has to be written back.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Use?
Max The Magnificent   7/7/2014 10:21:03 AM
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@resistion: Each read takes a cycle as well, you still have to write after read.

You don't always have to perform a write after performing a read.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Use?
Max The Magnificent   7/7/2014 10:20:23 AM
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@resistion: Each read takes a cycle as well, you still have to write after read.

But reading from any form of memory (Flash, EPROM, FRAM) doesn'd degrade it and doesn't count as part of the total number of cycles -- when they say Flash can support only 10,000 cycles, for example, they are talking about erase-&-write cycles, not read cycles.

resistion
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CEO
Re: Use?
resistion   7/4/2014 7:43:37 PM
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Each read takes a cycle as well, you still have to write after read.

RNEU
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Rookie
Re: KB?
RNEU   6/30/2014 9:06:06 AM
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Up to 128kB might be more than enough for many applications.

If an application needs MBs go for an MCU with MBs and you can justify the cost. A smart sensor sitting remotely powered from <4mA in a 4-20mA loop or a smoke detector will never need MBs.

 

TI_Mark
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Rookie
Re: Use?
TI_Mark   6/26/2014 6:29:23 PM
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The devices in the MSP430FR59x/FR69x series can protect portions of code using a couple of built-in modules. The Memory Protection Unit (MPU) monitors and supervises memory segments as defined in software to be protected as read, write, execute or a combination of the three. What's more, these devices have built-in IP Encapsulation (IPE) capabilities to lock sections of code from access via JTAG, BSL or Direct Memory Access.

Kinnar
User Rank
CEO
FRAM really gives speed and power improvement
Kinnar   6/26/2014 2:08:37 PM
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FRAM based controllers from TI are really a very nice design and provide improvement both in terms of speed and power. Many small size embedded systems are adopting these controllers especially in biomedical equipments.

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Use?
Max The Magnificent   6/26/2014 1:14:42 PM
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@GSKrasle: Do they provide some way to lock/protect the code portion of the memory?

I don't know -- I'll ask them

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