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Denise J. Wasson
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Rookie
Re: TechShop and LabVIEW
Denise J. Wasson   7/8/2014 3:14:56 AM
This conference and the exhibition are really appreciated, this makes the younger generation more enrourage to do better world through using technology. The resume writer will help to learn them about this issue. I also attended that conference and exhibition. That was really enjoyable.

Denise J. Wasson
User Rank
Rookie
Re: TechShop and LabVIEW
Denise J. Wasson   7/8/2014 3:12:21 AM
This conference and the exhibition are really appreciated, this makes the younger generation more enrourage to do better world through using technology. The resume writer will help to learn them about this issue. I also attended that conference and exhibition. That was really enjoyable.

ewertz
User Rank
Manager
Re: TechShop and LabVIEW
ewertz   7/3/2014 8:48:41 PM
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In the case of the Autodesk products, "students and educators" can get free 3-year licenses.  The overriding restriction is that no commercial or professional use is permitted.

How difficult it is for you in your country to be a "student or educator" under their rules may vary.  In the US, being enrolled in a single adult-education class would likely be enough.

Autodesk has matured enough to know that it's not in their best interest (anymore) to criminalize non-commercial uses of their products.  They're hooking you in so that you can (and will) pay them when you do your Kickstarter or turn your hobby into a small business.  Until then you're never going to be a paying customer ($2-4K), and everyone knows that.

I used Eagle for years and until I sold my first board, we both knew I wasn't going to pay for the software (because there were plenty of alternatives).  When that changed, Eagle (CadSoft) got paid.  This only happened because they supported non-commerical use. Student licenses and trials are marketing tools that bring in money later, where no money would ever have been had, had you started with any competitor's (free or otherwise) product.  But the second you go public, you're a prosecution target for the software vendors -- as you should be.

Bottom line: If you're intent on using their software for free, you're going to, one way or another.  Incenting bootlegging doesn't help anyone, and this approach eliminates the overwhelming majority of it.

Decent sized outfits like Adafruit never stopped using Eagle because there was no reason to switch once they started.  Only idiot companies continue to systematically push potential licensees away from their products (see also: Altium).  Both Adobe and Autodesk are realizing this.  Their competition is FOSS as much as it is each other -- probably even moreso.

 

 

TonyTib
User Rank
CEO
Re: TechShop and LabVIEW
TonyTib   7/3/2014 4:42:03 PM
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Details, please.  I don't think Autodesk has changed the terms for the "professional" line like AutoCAD, Inventor, and such.


Yes, they've added the 123D line, which is free for non-commercial use -- and 123D Design is probably one of the more capable 3D MCAD programs (I haven't tried it yet, but it's on my list).


The situation is much better if you can deal with STL file output (e.g. for 3D printers), since that's what you can get from programs such as DesignSpark Mechanical (free) and Cubify Design ($200).

ewertz
User Rank
Manager
Re: TechShop and LabVIEW
ewertz   7/3/2014 4:21:30 PM
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 there aren't many for areas such as 3D MCAD and CAM.

Recently both AutoDesk and Adobe have liberalized their licensing for the academic/maker/non-profit crowd for their CAD offerings.  It is true that CAM is still lagging behind though.  If you haven't checked Adobe/Autodesk in the last year or two, you may be surprised that they've made a lot of headway in that area.

 

TonyTib
User Rank
CEO
Re: TechShop and LabVIEW
TonyTib   7/3/2014 3:55:32 PM
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Given the limited equipment, maybe it'd be better to do the software learning & designing at home, and only do the "making" at TechShop or equivalent.

The big fly in the ointment here, of course, is the price of some software.  While there are many good options for free or low cost software development, embedded development, 2D MCAD, free-form 3D CAD, and PCB design, there aren't many for areas such as 3D MCAD and CAM.  (The free or very low cost 3D MCAD tools have many limitations that make them almost useless to me, and the much better but getting expensive ones like Geomagic/Alibre Design Elements ($1000) still have limitations (e.g. Geomagic DE doesn't handle surfaces well)).

For physical equipment, eBay and local surplus shops are great resources, if you are persistent.  But you still have to find space to sore and time to use all that stuff: if joining TechShop et al is like joining a health club, then buying your own equipment can be like buying a treadmill: used a lot the first month, but just collecting dust after six months.

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: TechShop and LabVIEW
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2014 2:35:28 PM
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@ewertz: But at least your mouse-buttoning-fingers are totally buff!

LOL

ewertz
User Rank
Manager
Re: TechShop and LabVIEW
ewertz   7/3/2014 2:33:00 PM
NO RATINGS
But at least your mouse-buttoning-fingers are totally buff!

 

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: TechShop and LabVIEW
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2014 2:24:04 PM
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@ewertz:  ...it's just like having another health club membership that you used in January, and...er... then not so much.

Have you been following me around? How do you know so much about me? LOL

ewertz
User Rank
Manager
Re: TechShop and LabVIEW
ewertz   7/3/2014 2:16:17 PM
NO RATINGS
Yup, it's like any subscription service, if you use it enough, it can be a sweet deal.  Otherwise it's just like having another health club membership that you used in January, and...er... then not so much.

TechShop has both one-day passes and a month-by-month option, so you can minimize the cost of your way in.  But like I said, once you start using tools that require the safety/intro class, the wallet has to swing open again.  If you only need to use hand tools for working wood and a place to spread the work you're slowly turning to dust, you're good to go.  The other benefits are the co-op deals with the software vendors so that you can get access to some pretty decent PCs with all of the Adobe/NI/CAM design software on them under the same price of entry.

Smartest thing is to get all of your materials bought, your design as far as it's going to go, and then join for a month and see how it all really works for you.

They also have frequent tours so that you get to see the whole place, what's available, and a sense for how much equipment is actually operational at one random point in time.

 

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