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TFCSD
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CEO
Wearable: Ask First 'Why Wear It?
TFCSD   7/6/2014 11:56:31 PM
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Remember the Casio CFX-400 scientific calulator watch in the 80's? I still waiting for that funtionality on a watch to show up again.

AZskibum
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Re: Let us define Wearable device
AZskibum   7/3/2014 1:28:48 PM
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Excellent and all-encompassing definition gonazlotudela!

gonzalotudela
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Rookie
Re: Let us define Wearable device
gonzalotudela   7/2/2014 2:36:25 PM
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There could be 3 umbrellas that would help define a wearable device.

1. Wearable: Device must be worn on the body throughout its use; it should not be carried.

* This encompasses more than clothing and accessories, such as exokeletons (http://vandrico.com/device/ekso-bionics)

2. Controllable: Device must be controllable by the user; this could be done either actively or passively.

* This encompasses passively controlled "fitbits", where the user is unaware of the data collection happening.

3. Enhancing: Device must augment knowledge, facilitate learning or enhance experience.

* This is to capture devices that offer unique attributes, such as air quality control detectors and head mounted displays.

 

You may want to check this out if you're interested in wearable technology - http://vandrico.com/database

_hm
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CEO
Re: Let us define Wearable device
_hm   7/1/2014 7:01:28 AM
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I got following definition from Wikipedia:

Wearable technologywearable devicestech togs, or fashion electronics are clothing and accessories incorporating computer and advanced electronic technologies. The designs often incorporate practical functions and features, but may also have a purely critical or aesthetic agenda.[1]

But this needs to be refined further.

 

AZskibum
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CEO
Re: Drawback of function-specific
AZskibum   6/30/2014 7:43:18 PM
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Ideally, I think a wearable should have a single function or very small number of related functions. A great example is a popular pedometer that is only a pedometer. I wear mine every day, and it can be unobtrusively worn almost anywhere on the body and completely hidden from view.

The same company makes a device that is only worn on the wrist and adds a couple more features like the ability to count vertical steps and the ability to monitor sleep. I can't fathom how sleep patterns relate to activity level measured in steps, and it seems to me that the sleep monitoring feature was added primarily because the developers found that it could be added at little to no exta cost -- not because active walkers & joggers were also keenly interested in monitoring their sleep.

lcovey
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Re: Let us define Wearable device
lcovey   6/30/2014 5:56:27 PM
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You might want to start with this report from Forrester: http://recode.net/2014/06/30/fill-bucket-with-cold-water-stick-out-wrist-dump-on-wearables/


 

elizabethsimon
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CEO
Re: Drawback of function-specific
elizabethsimon   6/30/2014 3:00:23 PM
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You make a point. I think as long as the number of functions that you want is small (less than four say), then it makes sense to have them separate. On the other hand, there are some features that it makes sense to combine. For instance a step counter could include a timer or stop watch or some other exercise related feature. On the other hand, combining a camera with a step counter wouldn't be as useful because you would likely want to wear them in different positions.

 

kfield
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Blogger
Drawback of function-specific
kfield   6/30/2014 2:04:26 PM
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I completely buy the argument that you don't want your wearable cluttered with too many features - kind of llike a spork except much less useful. BUT I don't exactly want to wearing a proliferation of wearables - one for steps, one for blood pressure, one for camera taking...my goodness we'd all be completely loaded down!

Ogerbi
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Rookie
Not Everyone misunderstood
Ogerbi   6/30/2014 1:33:49 PM
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Not everyone misunderstood the action-sports camera market.

Check out Ronald Foster's invention of the completely integrated helmet camera. US6,819,354 filed June 2000. Gives him the method and apparatus now seemingly in the most advanced GoPro HERO3+ Black where a cell phone / app became his remote terminal. This was a marketing guy. Maybe he surfed.

Duane Benson
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Blogger
Re: Solving a non existant problem
Duane Benson   6/30/2014 12:50:08 PM
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lcovey - I agree with that. I think it's good and vauable for the hobby and DIY world to experiement with crazy ideas that may not have any real use, but when a company is selling something, they have a responsiblity  to their customers to sell devices with actual valuable uses.

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