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betajet
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VT100? You're just a pup.
betajet   7/2/2014 2:37:49 PM
Pfui.  The only way to get started is punched cards, paper tape, and toggling in the RIM loader through the PDP-8 switch register.  Them newfanged "glass teletypes" will only lead to trouble.  You kids get off my lawn!  :-)

I've never heard of gweeps.  It must be a WPI thing, since gweep is almost an anagram of WPI.  When I was an undergrad, programmers had Rasputin-like long scraggly beards, carried around boxes of cards, consulted documentation in huge binders filled with cabalistic incantations, and were generally regarded as all-powerful druids.

All that ended when you could buy floppy disks at K-mart.

MeasurementBlues
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Re: VT100? You're just a pup.
MeasurementBlues   7/2/2014 2:48:55 PM
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@betajet

Click on "Gweeps" at the top of the article for a link. Yes, it's a WPI thing. Supposedly the name came from terminals pre-VT100 that would beep whenver you touched a key. That was before my time.

 

MeasurementBlues
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Re: VT100? You're just a pup.
MeasurementBlues   7/2/2014 2:49:43 PM
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A few years after graduating, I returned to my fraternity house and  was appalled. There was a TV-100 in  the  second floor landing, connected over an acoustic dialup modem to  the school VAX computer. A great convenience, but it  meant the gweeps had taken over sacred space.

RGARVIN640
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Re: VT100? You're just a pup.
RGARVIN640   7/2/2014 3:01:29 PM
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You are not old school unless you used punch cards to enter your programs. My first embedded programming was with an Altair 8800(?) toggleing switches. Then got to work with a 6803 system writing assembly language and storing them on the 8 inch floppy!! First system design was a 6502 based cpu, so wrote assembly code on an Apple II computer.

betajet
User Rank
CEO
Re: VT100? You're just a pup.
betajet   7/2/2014 3:04:32 PM
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Guinea pigs also go gweep, gweep, gweeeep.  Either that or jeep, jeep, jeeeeeep.

 

MeasurementBlues
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Re: VT100? You're just a pup.
MeasurementBlues   7/2/2014 3:12:31 PM
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I did use punch cards my freshman year and I don't miss them. I don't miss floppy disks, either.

RGARVIN640
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Manager
Re: VT100? You're just a pup.
RGARVIN640   7/2/2014 3:24:08 PM
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I don't miss them either, as I paid $350 for my first floppy drive. An Apple II with  147K storage capacity! Woz was the man. New EE's now do not have a clue on how much easier things are now, compared to back then.

betajet
User Rank
CEO
Re: VT100? You're just a pup.
betajet   7/2/2014 3:24:32 PM
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The great thing about punch cards is that you can fold them into missiles and launch them using a rubber band.  They're really dangerous: the point is sharp and they'll go quite a ways into acoustic tile ceilings.

Try doing that with a flash drive :-)

MeasurementBlues
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Re: VT100? You're just a pup.
MeasurementBlues   7/2/2014 3:37:17 PM
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New EE's now do not have a clue on how much easier things are now, compared to back then.

And yet, we work more today than back then. What went wrong?

betajet
User Rank
CEO
Re: VT100? You're just a pup.
betajet   7/2/2014 4:02:29 PM
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Martin wrote: And yet, we work more today than back then. What went wrong?

While some things are indeed a lot easier now -- my favorite example is being able to capture transient events using a digital 'scope -- many things are much harder.  In particular, it's much harder for a CPU to talk to I/O devices.  My favorite example of this is that the PDP-11 Peripherals Handbook has a chapter called "Programming" which covers how to write I/O programs in PDP-11 assembly language using both busy-waiting and interrupts.  The chapter is eight pages long.

Nowadays device-level programmers have to deal with Windows or Linux device drivers, which require understanding thousands of pages of arbitrary complexity, and modern SoCs require hundreds or thousands of lines of initialization code just to get started.

Another example is USB.  If you're using a properly-designed USB device, it's really easy: you just plug it in and it installed as if by magic.  If you're writing the software to implement that magic, it's a nightmare.

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