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lakehermit
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Re: Rotary Tools
lakehermit   7/4/2014 2:58:56 PM
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RE the drill bit in a tube, I have a few of these in different sizes. Mine are called pad cutters and are made by a company called Vector. These leave a center hole into which a press fit pin can be installed, the pin having a vertical slot into which leads and wires can be soldered. These are quite inexpensive when you consider the speed at which a breadboard can be constructed to build that one of a kind circuit for some project.

ca94002
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Rookie
Hands on approaches
ca94002   7/4/2014 2:37:07 PM
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Great article - a reminder to the many approaches to making a "Hole in One" or more...

I have four, albeit less elegant, tools for making holes which are useful for some applications.1. LaboratoryHole Drill- originally used to put hole in lab stoppers - they come in a set stacked inside each other like Russian Dolls. For holes in soft materials like palstic - they work great. OK for the one up, low volume projects
2. The Leather Punch - mine has 5 or 6 dies for different size holes -originally belts etc but again thin sheets of rubber or plastic -works great...
3. Whitney Punches - a kit of various punches -  hand punch -quick and easy way to punch even through aluminum sheets...sort of a hand Greenlee
4. Tried and true - the Hand Reamer -for those slight adjustments to the - opps too small hole



All do not require charging before use or power cord!

 

 

tom-ii
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Blogger
Favorite hole-making tools
tom-ii   7/4/2014 9:21:01 AM
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David Ashton
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Re: Rotary Tools
David Ashton   7/4/2014 5:01:03 AM
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@Sheetal - yes doing stuff yourself saves money and (as my father used to say) "If you want a job done well, do it yourself!"

But it pays to have the right tool for the job, it saves a lot of time  (and swearing) and in extreme cases you can't get the job done without it.

Sheetal.Pandey
User Rank
Manager
Re: Rotary Tools
Sheetal.Pandey   7/4/2014 2:51:07 AM
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 Yes having drilling gun at home with different beads is quite helpful. You can do so much yourself. We have one from Black and Decker. Very satisfied. In India the regular way is to call a carpenter or electrician if you want to get any of these things done. Because labor is very cheap. But now they are either not available or they do poor job so better do it yourself. And after home depos coming in here, its so much fun to set things yourself.

zeeglen
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Blogger
Re: Rotary Tools
zeeglen   7/3/2014 6:56:09 PM
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@David  Sounds like a spade bit, but finer so it does not cut so deep.

It had a small drill bit centered inside a hollow cylinder with 4 teeth around the circumference, so like a hole saw it cut out a circle in the copper.  Depth was only enough to remove the copper plane and leave an isolated copper island with a hole in the middle for component leads.   Worked great in a Dremel.

Tried to find a link, no luck.  Used them 25 years ago so maybe they are not made anymore.  I think they were called 'drill mills', a google search turns up a lot of drill mills but nothing like this particular bit.

David Ashton
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Blogger
Re: 256 Holes
David Ashton   7/3/2014 6:18:27 PM
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@Max... "9/16" for the Fresnel lenses"

That's almost half an inch, so not as difficult as finer work.

I'd still go with the centre punch and small drill to start - even go thru 3 drills.

One trick that might work here is to use a piece of veroboard (stripboard, perfboard) as a guide.  Use a first drill that's the same size as the stripboard holes - 1 mm or so.  You can then just manually mark the first hole in the right place, drill a small hole and then  use a fairly thick piece of wire - or another  drill - to get the stripboard aligned with  the first hole.    Then use the stripboard - which you will have pre-marked with a felt tip pen - to drill small holes precisely spaced.  For your matrix you will have to move the stripboard a few times, but locate it in the previously drilled holes and you should be right.  You'll now have a bunch of 1mm holes instead of your centre punch marks.  Use a slightly bigger drill - 1/8 inch maximum - to enlarge the holes before finally drilling them to 9/16.

This technique works really well for LEDs mounted on stripboard - obviously if you use the stripboard for your hole spacing it will be exactly the same as the LED spacing....

Max The Magnificent
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Blogger
Re: 256 Holes
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2014 5:14:38 PM
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@David: ...then use the final size drill (you don't say what that is, but I'd assume for 5mm LEDs?

9/16" for the Fresnel lenses

David Ashton
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Blogger
Re: 256 Holes
David Ashton   7/3/2014 5:04:19 PM
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@Max...if you can't find someone to do it commercially for a reasonable fee then
  1. Mark out VERY carefully with as fine a pen or scriber as you can 
  2. Use a centre punch to start the hole in the right place
  3. Use a small drill (1/16 or smaller) first
  4. Then use the final size drill (you don't say what that is, but I'd assume for 5mm LEDs?

Steps 2/3/4 are the best way to make sure your hole goes where you mark it.

David Ashton
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The size of the chips matters to some
David Ashton   7/3/2014 5:00:06 PM
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@Mongo647... "mostly because I have the punch/die for D-shaped 3/8 hole needed for BNC jacks."

You're a lucky man.  Some switches need a similar hole.  I have always just made a circular hole and used lock washers, but they can come loose.  

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