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David Ashton
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Re: Nibblers
David Ashton   7/12/2014 6:24:50 AM
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Hi Crusty.  That type is good.  Contact the seller and see if you can negotiate a bit on the postage - bear in mind the figure I gave would have been to Australia, it might be cheaper to the UK.  You may find others - I think I searched on "hand nibbler" to find that one, but try "nibbling cuttter" and other such search terms.  There are some very tasty purpose built electric ones out there as well, which is why I tried including "Hand" in it.   Good luck....

Crusty1
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CEO
Re: Nibblers
Crusty1   7/12/2014 6:13:14 AM
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Hi David: That's the type I had and they rearly do work work, especially from inside the box outward.

I will now see how the budget is after buying all those bits of electronic frippery that a man in the know just has to have.

Cheers

Crusty

David Ashton
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Re: Nibblers
David Ashton   7/12/2014 6:02:35 AM
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Crusty...have a look at this one I found on Ebay, it is identical to the one I have:

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Hand-Nibbler-Sheet-Metal-Cutting-Tool-NEW-/270996948066?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f18ad4462&_uhb=1



US$ 30 plus nearly 50 postage.  Also sharp intake of breath material.....

David Ashton
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Re: Nibblers
David Ashton   7/12/2014 5:28:59 AM
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@Crusty I found the following at Element 14 (Farnell) but (a) none of them look like mine and (b) the prices are likely to give you a sharp intake of breath.....(as E14 prices are wont to do :-)

http://uk.farnell.com/jsp/search/results.jsp?N=0&Ntk=gensearch&Ntt=nibbler&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&suggestions=false&ref=globalsearch&_requestid=61574

David Ashton
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Re: Nibblers
David Ashton   7/12/2014 5:21:30 AM
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Hi Crusty..  Don'tcha hate it when one of your tools passes on to tool heaven and you can't find another one?  I will keep my eyes open and let you know if I find one..   I can thoroughly recommend the drill-accessory ones but I see your point, my hand one is also more suited to square holes, though it is going the way of yours I fear.....

Crusty1
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CEO
Nibblers
Crusty1   7/12/2014 4:54:58 AM
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Hi David,

Nibblers for aluminium sheet of up to 1mm thickness I had a lovely hand operated nibbler, sadly it passed away, through my own fault of presenting it with too much to nibble.

Problem is I have never been able to find another, Its not always useful to have a drill driven one.

Car boots and second hand tool shops have never turned up another for me. If any reader knows wherethe are still obtainable then you would get a big thanks from Crusty.

Nibblers are great for square holes.

 

David Ashton
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Re: Kind of limited article
David Ashton   7/10/2014 4:46:15 PM
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@Another - this article could have been 3 or 4 times the size it is and I still would not have covered all possible ways of making holes.  

So how WOULD you make a hole in glass?  As I recall there are special drill bits for that??

another nickname
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Rookie
Kind of limited article
another nickname   7/10/2014 3:53:33 PM
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I use a bit wider variety of tools to make holes.

Most of the time, it's just a nail and a hammer . It's the breakable medium (e.g. glass) when you have to get creative. Microtorch (and anything combustible) gets me excited easily but I couldn't use it as much as I'd like to. Old soldering iron could be used to make holes in PVCs - of course, you wouldn't use the tip directly, you would wrap metal wire of needed diameter on it . And then there are chemicals - lovely sulfuric acid made more holes in my clothes than in the objects of my experiments.

TonyTib
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CEO
Re: drills
TonyTib   7/10/2014 12:59:01 PM
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Also, another option is to look on eBay for a working used drill of the same or similar model, for one to salvage for parts, or for the broken part.  It's a long shot, but worth trying.

 

 

TonyTib
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CEO
Re: drills
TonyTib   7/10/2014 12:51:50 PM
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It looks like not everything is made in China; for example, on Amazon I found a German made Bosch drill (for >$400) and a German made Fein drill (>$800).  I believe that Proxxon rotary tools are still made in Germany, but they're not drills.


BTW, just about everything is "globally sourced", including a lot of stuff that's "Made In China".  For example, most memory (DRAM, flash) isn't made in China.

Also off topic: my vacuum is a German-made Bosch canister vac.  The price was reasonable (unlike Miele and some others).  It's 8 years old and still going strong; the Dyson canister vac was more expensive, made in Malasia, and had a lot of quality complaints.

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