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kfield
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I remember those days
kfield   7/27/2014 12:31:37 PM
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As a former employee of Cahners I remember those days, but only vaguely. I made it routine even then to go into the office on Sundays, to catch up on all the stuff that I had put off during the week. I've always thought that a four-day (ten hours a day) week would be fabulous, but that's only possible if you work 40 hours to begin with. 

antedeluvian
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boss
antedeluvian   7/27/2014 5:29:56 PM
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Martin

But, the downside of working at home is that you never leave work.

And you have a rotten boss!

zeeglen
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Re: boss
zeeglen   7/27/2014 6:22:10 PM
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Must disagree.  Being your own boss is the best anyone could hope for.

It's also  nice to have a salaried outside job where you put in some extra time every day, spend a few minutes of your lunch hour eating a small snack at your desk but occasionally taking time off for an extra-long lunch with your colleagues, and having the freedom for those doctor/dentist visits without having to account for the hours, or leaving work early to attend a music festival.  Having a boss that does NOT count minutes of working time is great.

 

MeasurementBlues
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Re: boss
MeasurementBlues   7/27/2014 10:28:28 PM
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@Zeeglen,

I've known people who would rather starve than work for someone else. They've given up well-paying corporate jobs to work for themselves because they have to be the boss.

MeasurementBlues
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Re: boss
MeasurementBlues   7/27/2014 10:26:12 PM
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Working for two web sites, I seem to have many bosses.

And you have a rotten boss!

 

suzanne.deffree
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Home office
suzanne.deffree   7/28/2014 12:02:13 PM
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I, like the author of this post and many others out there, work from home. We are currently house hunting and have made an office in a separate location from the main house -- be it in the basement, a space over the garage or entirely separate apartment -- a priority for the reasons you note.  As I sit now, in what many would consider main floor living space, the lines between work and life often blur. 

C VanDorne
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Re: Home office
C VanDorne   7/29/2014 8:45:26 AM
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When I "worked" from home I found myself to be horribly unproductive.  Thus the quotes around the word "worked" above.  There were just too many interesting distractions and I hated the never-off status.  It was from this that I learned about this self-disciplinary limitation: I need to be in a place of professional work to do professional work.  I'm glad to have that now.  When I physically leave home in the morning it's like declaring to myself: 'I dedicate this day to productive work'.  I greatly respect anyone who can get in that special mental place of productivity while at home.  Wow!

As for the 35 hour work week...yeah, I must have totally missed out on that.  For me, reading that part of this article is like reading historical fiction.  I find myself asking "Are you kidding me!?  That actually happened!?  When?  Where?  Noooo...REALLY?"  Good for all of you who enjoyed it.  I hope your memories are fond.

Measurement.Blues
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Re: Home office
Measurement.Blues   7/29/2014 8:54:11 AM
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@C VanDorne,

Before working at home full time, I'd work at home once in a while but you're right, it was distracting. There is always something to do at home.

There was a time before UBM took over that the publisher of EDN and T&MW, who had become the defacto office boss, declared "If you're not in the office, you're traveling, on vacation, or sick." That meant you were expected to be in the office even during bad winter weather. I refused to make the trip to the office in the snow. That "boss" was let go two months after UBM took over. He had become intolerable.

For the last six months of having an office, I worked at home two days a week. That was a good transition.

Measurement.Blues
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Re: Home office
Measurement.Blues   7/29/2014 8:46:34 AM
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the lines between work and life often blur.

That explains why I finished another Friday quiz at 11:30 last night.

Bert22306
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CEO
A growing economy
Bert22306   7/28/2014 7:12:07 PM
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When you consider your productivity compared with even five to ten years ago, you realize that you're producing far more per hour than you once did. But you're still working more hours. What happened? It's called global competition, business downturns, business upturns, and so on.

This all falls under increased productivity, and leaving aside the global competition aspects, it's instrumental to keep the economy growing. Which keeps your investments growing, hopefully assuring you a viable retirement package. If this were not occurring, it's hard to fathom how the economy would be able to support so many more people in retirement now, for the amount in the work force.

Some stats. In 1950, the US Social Security system had to support one retiree with the revenues from 5.1 workers. In 2005, there were only 3.3 workers supporting one retiree. The projection for 2020 is 2.6, and it keeps falling over the years.

http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/ssb/v66n4/v66n4p37.html

So, one unavoidable mechanism, to make this possible, is that each worker must contribute more to the economy. Productivity.

As to working hours, depending on your job, that is not so easy to measure. Certainly, if you are a cashier, or a receptionist, medical practitioner, or any job that deals directly with customers, it's probably easy enough to measure your working hours. Not quite the same for researchers, for example, not to mention school teachers.

The office environment also makes a difference in productivity, which is probably hard to measure. For instance, this much-hyped "open space" type of environment is one sure way of making concentration more difficult, and productivity lower in jobs that require concentration.

I'm always skeptical about these x-hour work week discussions. I'm fairly positive that being glued to your office chair for "40 hours a week" doesn't translate to work being done. If all else remains equal, reducing the work week to 35 hours would reduce productivity, and increasing to 45 hours would increase productivity. However all else is almost never equal. Some days I get a whole lot done, other days, for any number of reasons, less so. Surely it's not just me.

zeeglen
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Re: A growing economy
zeeglen   7/28/2014 10:11:35 PM
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@Bert For instance, this much-hyped "open space" type of environment is one sure way of making concentration more difficult, and productivity lower in jobs that require concentration.

Very astute observation.  Been there many times. So why do management types get nice quiet offices when the engineers who do all the thinking get dumped into a noisy cubeville?

Measurement.Blues
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CEO
Re: A growing economy
Measurement.Blues   7/28/2014 11:50:16 PM
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So why do management types get nice quiet offices when the engineers and editors who do all the thinking get dumped into a noisy cubeville?

When I worked in a office, last, there was this sales guy who was so loud that even when we both had (adjacent) offices with walls, I had to relocate to a conference room when I needed to think. His voice came right through the walls. He had this DJ kind of voice. I'm convinced that he really wanted to be a sportscaster but ended up selling ads.

In the previous two buildings, we both had cubes.

Now I work at home and about all I hear is my neighbor's little dog yapping away.

Measurement.Blues
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CEO
Re: A growing economy
Measurement.Blues   7/29/2014 9:02:49 AM
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@zeeglen,

You remember my previous gig, running The Connecting Edge? That was not a full-time job but an all-time job. Now, I do get to take one day a week completely off, sometimes two. I also get to take vacation, though I try to pre-load the site with content. Thus I'm going into crazy mode now.

On the morning of May 26, 2013,An e-mail arrived informing me that I had earned a two-week sabbatical for having been at this job for 21 years. UBM grants that every 7 years but at years 7 and 14 I worked for another company. I laughed.

I thought having that time off was hilarious. UBM gave me 18 months to use the time, that must be taken in full week blocks. I managed to take one week this year and had to get a six-month extension to not lose the other. I'll take it next year.

 

zeeglen
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Re: A growing economy
zeeglen   7/29/2014 9:45:59 AM
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@Martin I managed to take one week this year and had to get a six-month extension to not lose the other.

Bummer.  I've known some who had to either take vacation or forfeit according to HR rules, but were not allowed to take their accrued time off because the project schedules and bosses would not allow it.  Not sure what they ended up doing, but i think they did what was necessary to "keep their job".

C VanDorne
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Re: A growing economy
C VanDorne   7/29/2014 9:01:50 AM
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Thanks Bert.  You've used govt statistics to validate something I've been saying about our economy for about five years now..there are, quite simply, too many people with too little to do.  In this case you site retiries.  That's a fact of demographics: war = vacuum of life = baby boom.  Add to that the problem of supporting the massive number of unemployed (the U3 number is a joke, look at the U6 number), and global competition - new foreign economies rising daily - and it is truly a wonder that this economy hasn't collapsed.  Our hard(er) work is to be credited.

Now, speaking of that...perhaps I should go do some.

AZskibum
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The neverending sprint to the (next) finish line
AZskibum   7/29/2014 12:15:15 AM
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Martin wrote "Sure, we always work extra hours when a project is due, but do you work extra hours all the time? Do you work at night from home, perhaps after the kids are asleep?"

Yes, it has always been the norm that everyone on the team goes into overdrive in the later stages of a project, to make sure everything gets done on schedule. Late nights, weekends, checking and launching jobs from home using the VPN. It was like the sprint at the end of the marathon.

But something changed along the way. Project schedules got tighter, resources got fewer, and the amount of work to be done became more, not less. So it was no longer the sprint at the end of the marathon, it was just a neverending sprint.

zeeglen
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Re: The neverending sprint to the (next) finish line
zeeglen   7/29/2014 1:31:19 AM
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@AZskibum Do you work at night from home, perhaps after the kids are asleep?

Do you have restless dreams about your current project, and wake up with either dread or enlightenment?  Maybe that is another sign of OCD...

Monkey_noise
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40?
Monkey_noise   7/29/2014 4:47:06 AM
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1 saves
40 hours? My work place is restricted to 37 hours unless you're an executive in which case hours worked are not recorded. There is a work around this though. We can accrue time off, up to 6 extra days per year (half a day a month).

We also have flexi time so most people can finish their hours at 12 on Friday and go home. I tend to not do this though as I take advantage of the quiet.

There's also the added rules from the EU to take into account which states workers are not allowed to average more than 40 hours over a 17 rolling week period, or something like that.

antennahead
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The usual socio-pathic corporate behavior
antennahead   7/29/2014 5:54:54 PM
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Not surprising the way any salaried worker is treated.

Corp. profit = income - expenses, and salaries are just like any other expense; to be minimized.

Capitalism, while extremely efficient, also tends to treat employees like bushels of corn or barrels of oil. So long as we treat people as commodities, no mater their talent, they will always be eventually abused, especially in an economic downturn.

 

DCH0
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8 hour days do not match international schedules
DCH0   7/30/2014 8:26:29 AM
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First, we are in a global competition for work.  Taking a 6 hour day does not work when our Asian colleagues are putting in 12 hours.

Second, I always have some colleague somewhere around the globe working.  With China, there is a 12 hour gap so you take teleconferences and e-mail at home in the evening or early morning hours.

docdivakar
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Manager
Re: 8 hour days do not match international schedules
docdivakar   7/30/2014 9:02:49 PM
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@DCH0 I hear you, I don't know of any one working 6 hours a day! I first thought it was missing a digit, it is more like 16hours when you include responding to emails from smartphones!

In these days of globalization, for tech workers, there is no such thing as 6hour work day and career success in the same sentence! Perhaps such work hours exist in other professions...

MP Divakar

caestrada
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The logic of 6 hours is simple
caestrada   7/31/2014 2:26:45 PM
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With current salary and more free time, it is almost known you will be out with your family having fun and expending more money.

If you go out one more day that today, you will use more the car, gas and buy at least, one more Coke.  If you multiply that by millions of northamericans, no matter how hard chinese worked, northamerican economy will accelerate in a very nationalist way...and everybody, will be happier.


Remember this equation Happinness = Salary/ (Job problems+ Boss Ideas +1)

Measurement.Blues
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CEO
Re: The logic of 6 hours is simple
Measurement.Blues   7/31/2014 2:49:07 PM
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Interesting equation. You'd appreciate this piece. More work/life equations.

Make More, Know Less

Happinness = Salary/ (Job problems+ Boss Ideas +1)

caestrada
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Re: The logic of 6 hours is simple
caestrada   7/31/2014 2:51:49 PM
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The 1 in the formula is because, we cannnot have infinite happiness, right? :-)

Measurement.Blues
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CEO
Re: The logic of 6 hours is simple
Measurement.Blues   7/31/2014 2:55:00 PM
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With current salary and more free time, it is almost known you will be out with your family having fun and expending more money.

That works for me, except I had to give up Coke, bagels too.

 

caestrada
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Re: The logic of 6 hours is simple
caestrada   7/31/2014 3:08:39 PM
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Yessss, you can take begels or whatever.  The economist's idea is to have you spending (and why not, use your credit card) in non durable goods...



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