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salbayeng
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Re: Duratool tool kits
salbayeng   8/22/2014 1:29:52 AM
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@david

Mine was the thin meter with foldover case and leads permanently attached. 

I did buy 10 of the Jaycar QM-1500's a while back, I checked the 20v range against a 5digit meter for each of them, and put a green dot on that range if it was within 1digit (they seem to be with 4 digits usually). The current ranges are pretty awful, So I use an external 1ohm resistor with back to back 1N5819's across it, and measure with the 200mV range = 200mA. The leads supplied with the meters are pretty awful, about 1 in 10 will be open circuit , brand new. The soldering on the input sockets can sometime be less than average and easy enough to get a dry joint after a few plugins/out, I've opened up a couple and refreshed the little dab of frosty lead free solder , with a full circumferential fillet of full lead solder and RMA flux.

For testing a batch of units I was making (with PV cells and batteries) I folded up a bit of aluminium so I could make a rack of 3 DMMs wide x 2 DMMs high at a good viewing angle, then stuck the meters on with blu-tak (poster adhesive) This way I can measure 3 currents and 2 voltages plus have a spare troubleshooting meter. I make up a "loom" with 22g hookup wire to go to the meters, and use those cheap little gold 4mm male banana pins that the RC guys use to hook up BLDC motors and batteries.  With the leftover 11 or so leads , I cut the probe off the end, and attach one of (a) a female contact (like those that go in 0.100" headers. (b) a gold plated pin from a 0.1" header (approx 0.024 across) (c) gold plated pin from 2mm header (about  0.016 across) , These leads usually attach quite well to standard clips and headers, and fit in vias and through hole pads on the PCB

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Duratool tool kits
Max The Magnificent   8/21/2014 5:20:34 PM
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@David: ...now you have one in your hot sticky hand, what do you think of them?

For th eprice ($2.50) they are brilliant -- not the best accuracy and certainly not a lot of precision -- but for something to slip in your back pocket or travelling toolkit - -just to be able to chesk "this and that" -- they are GREAT

David Ashton
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Re: Duratool tool kits
David Ashton   8/21/2014 4:03:13 PM
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@Max....now you have one in your hot sticky hand, what do you think of them?  My feeling is - not top quality by any means, but good features in somethings so small, and adequate for a toolkit.  Buy sa small cheap camera bag to keep it in, along with the original probes plus a set of alligator leads (AND a spare battery!) and you have something really useful.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Duratool tool kits
Max The Magnificent   8/21/2014 10:24:55 AM
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@David: FYI -- Those QM-1502 multimeters you recommended from Jaycar came in -- I bought 11 at US$2.50 each (because they have a $25 minimum) -- I've got one in my travelling toolkit and I'm giving the rest away as "stocking stuffers"

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Interesting discovery
Max The Magnificent   8/21/2014 10:21:31 AM
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@salbayeng: ...one of the fun things to do on field trips is to compare your toolkit with your colleague's. So after the obligatory Mick Dundee quote "call that a knife" ...

LOL

David Ashton
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Re: Duratool tool kits
David Ashton   8/21/2014 8:01:36 AM
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@Salbayeng - was it the thin meter with a foldover case you got, or the Jaycar type one?

I had a super small (almost credit card size) meter I got from a Tandy but it also did not survive long.  One problem with these meters is that the leads go straight into the meter and they will almost certainly fail there.  The Jaycar one uses standard 4mm Banana plugs which I think is a plus.

salbayeng
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Re: Duratool tool kits
salbayeng   8/21/2014 7:24:31 AM
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@ max

Re credit card meter : 

I got a nearly identical one from Sears , (with the Craftsman brand), about a decade ago it was ~ $30.

It was great , but couldn't survive the rigours of being knocked around in the toolkit, it only works now if you squeeze it .

I had a field toolkit about the size of a schoolkids lunchbox, it had screwdrivers/cutters /pliers/ loupe / allenkeys / battery soldering iron etc, Not enough space for "real meter"

 

 

salbayeng
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Re: Interesting discovery
salbayeng   8/20/2014 11:32:33 PM
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Ok Seen these, one of the fun things to do on field trips is to compare your toolkit with your colleague's. So after the obligatory Mick Dundee quote "call that a knife" , discovered the guys from Canada had this neat leatherman knife, like you described, with the tiny bits , and proceeded to do a hard disk swap on a laptop with it.

My favourite is a tiny little knife from radio shack, that has excellent wire cutters and strippers as well as screwdrivers/knife etc. It fits on your keyring so you always have it with you. Sadly I leave it at home now to avoid getting it confiscated at airline check-ins.  

Max The Magnificent
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Re: What???
Max The Magnificent   8/13/2014 1:34:04 PM
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@David: Is that it Max??

I think different people do it different ways. It was new to me when I came over here. The way they play it in my wife's family is that everyone buys a single gift (they specify some maximum amount you can spend). They then draw numbers for who goes in which order.

All the presents are gift wrapped and on a table in the middle of the room. The first person chooses whatever gift they like the look of -- then unwrap it to see what it is.

The next person does the same -- additionally they can decide to keep their gift, or exchange it with the first person.

Similarly, subsequent people can keep their gifts or exchange them with any of the preceding gifts.

At the end of the day, each person only has to purchase a single gift and each person ends up with a single gift.

Personally, I find it to be a pain in the rear end, but that's family for you LOL

David Ashton
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Re: What???
David Ashton   8/8/2014 8:32:30 PM
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Calm down Karen :-)  If it's what I think, in Aussie we call it "Secret Santa".  People put their name and a VERY rough idea of what they want on a piece of paper, the papers are then put into a hat and everyone draws one.    You then have to buy something for the person whose paper you drew.   Is that it Max??

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