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Matthieu Wipliez
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Designing custom accelerators
Matthieu Wipliez   8/11/2014 10:09:11 AM
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Multicore designs are running out of gas, given the lack of parallelism in most software. Nevertheless, "there are several really interesting opportunities for new microprocessors."

Indeed, we're still waiting to see the real benefits of those cores! Multicore platforms are tricky to program, and performance is inherently limited by a single shared memory. I think a much more promising platform is many-core with distributed memory (like Adapteva or Kalray). It will still be difficult to write manycore programs, but at least the architecture is sound.

I believe that there could be another way. If it were easier to design hardware (for example using better languages, like Cx), people could actually make their own accelerators. Then all you would need would be better FPGA architectures (using much less area and power) or a simpler, cheaper way to make ASICs. Lattice seems to be getting pretty good at low-power FPGAs, and eASIC's solution looks interesting for lower-cost ASICs. Maybe we'll get there soon? (the fact that Intel is making a hybrid Xeon-FPGA chip might be another indication)

DouglasMotaDiasDSc
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Freelancer
Nvidia abandons 64-bit Denver chip for servers
DouglasMotaDiasDSc   8/11/2014 1:16:18 PM
It seems that Denver Project is dead... :-(

Nvidia cancels plans to develop a 64-bit ARM chip for servers as questions linger about the viability of such products

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9249291/Nvidia_abandons_64_bit_Denver_chip_for_servers

rick merritt
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Author
Re: Nvidia abandons 64-bit Denver chip for servers
rick merritt   8/11/2014 9:30:39 PM
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@Douglas: Thanks for the link.

Nvidia announced Denver for mobile SoCs here at Hot Chips today, but it the server segment has clearly become very competitive ahead of any market traction.

Some Guy
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Manager
If the headline ends in a question mark ...
Some Guy   8/11/2014 3:13:58 PM
Old newspaper headline trick: If the headline ends in a question mark, the answer is "No."

 

Frankly, it's Intel's to lose. To the extent that they continue to provide the most value, Intel well remain. Interesting to note that Intel is leading the disruptions in that they took on the ARM threat in servers head-on and got the microserver chip to market 2-years ahead of ARM offerings. And not only have they gone down-market with Atom which is more power-efficient and/or performant than ARM, they have recently introduced Quark for robotics and the Internet of Things. While it certainly behooves Google and Apple to invest in their own hardware, it doesn't seem like it will pencil out because of the tremendous volumes, and $B in capital it takes each year to be competitive in the chip business.

DougInRB
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Manager
Re: If the headline ends in a question mark ...
DougInRB   8/11/2014 5:09:30 PM
I agree.

Apple/Google/Amazon/etc. may be able to spend a bunch of $$$$$ to save a few $$ for themselves.  Who else would use their custom CPU?  Given the tremendous investment required to maintain the processor infrastructure (compilers, memory interfaces, I/O hubs, annual product refresh, etc.), I can't see this being anything more than an attempt to get Intel to lower their prices.

Google and others must do what they do best - and it isn't making CPUs.  They may choose a different CPU company that better meets their needs, but I can't imagine there ever being a benefit of becoming a CPU company.

The biggest threat to Intel's CPU business  are the likes of Janet Reno...

alex_m1
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CEO
1T sram
alex_m1   8/11/2014 3:22:21 PM
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Zvi orbach mentioned a 1T sram cells being developed by one of his companies. Since most processors today are mostly made of large caches ,and since most likely this will be used for processes ouside intel (i believe) , this could greatly help intel's competitors.

 

Also easic had started to offer low NRE, low volume, 28nm asic manufacturing recently.Like Matthieu says, it might be good enough to compete with intel in some use cases.





Gondalf
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Freelancer
Re: 1T sram
Gondalf   8/14/2014 8:20:56 AM
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Intel 0.092un2 22nm sram cell was 1T too. So it is not a news.

The real issue they are pretty slow and power hungry.

Simon7382
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Manager
Naah
Simon7382   8/12/2014 3:21:42 AM
I would not trust much the opinion of someone with Transmeta credentials regarding microprocessors. Intel's strength is not in microprocessor architecture but in semiconductor processing, in which it is by 2.5-3 generations ahead of the next guy. Google would be really dumb trying to take on Intel in microprocessors. It is VERY far away from their core competence. Charlie Sporck was one of the greats of the semiconductor industry and he lost his job at Nat Semi because he tried and failed to take on Intel in microprocessors. The Nat Semi processor was MUCH better architecturally than the x86 architecture (and it was optimized to run Unix) but Intel easily won because Nat Semi could not compete in IC manufacturing.

rick merritt
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Author
Re: Naah
rick merritt   8/12/2014 11:32:52 AM
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@Simon: Charlie Sporck was ahead of my time, but I know National CEO Brian Halla tried to beat Intel in CPUs and failed, using the Cyrix core, I believe.

Sheetal.Pandey
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Manager
Re: Naah
Sheetal.Pandey   8/12/2014 11:30:37 PM
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I dont think Google or Apple can disrupt INtel. Google being a ppredominantly web company can try in hardware but being successful or even being in the market would be a challenge. Hardware is a different business it doesnt work like web. They may scratch for some time and leave it. Apple also may not be go very long in hardware design.

Stuart2121
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Rookie
INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Stuart2121   8/17/2014 7:00:26 AM
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INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL

I invented a CPU cooler - 3 times better than previous best - better than water. Intel have major CPU cooling problems - "Intel's microprocessors were generating so much heat that they were melting" (iht.com) - try to talk to them - they send my communications to my competitor & will not talk to me

Winners of major 'Corporate Social Responsibility' awardS!!

Huh!!!! When did RICO get repealed?"

INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!

BTW, I have the evidence - my competitor gave it to me.

BBTW, I am prepared to apologize to Intel if;

• They can show that the actions were those of a single individual in the company, acting outside corporate policy, and:

• They gain redress on my behalf.

Inventors - help your fellow inventors - share your experiences with companies - good and bad.

Jack.L
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CEO
Re: INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Jack.L   8/18/2014 12:54:33 PM
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Since you are claiming this is now public domain, please feel free to post details of your amazing invention better than anyone else is doing for peer review.

Stuart2121
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Rookie
Re: INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Stuart2121   8/18/2014 1:09:11 PM
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Thanks Jack, but no thanks.

I only told them of the invention, I did not tell them anything specific about it.

NDA & $500,000 disclosure fee, & I'll squawk like a parrot.

Stuart.

Jack.L
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CEO
Re: INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Jack.L   8/18/2014 1:14:42 PM
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I don't understand. 

It sounds like you provided no details of the invention to Intel then other than its existence. Did you have an NDA in place with Intel? If you did, then surely you would have a clear case of violation of that document and not resort to a public posting like you did?

Do you have a patent on this invention?

Stuart2121
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Rookie
Re: INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Stuart2121   8/18/2014 7:47:55 PM
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I did not say Intel broke the law or an NDA.

I just said that if you are an inventor, you can't trust them. Based on my experience.

And the patent attorney industry has got its last ever dollar from me.

My reason for posting is to let inventors know that there is no level playing field in this game. Very common in industry, & Intel are a 'fine example'.

Jack.L
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CEO
Re: INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Jack.L   8/18/2014 7:55:10 PM
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Given what you have wrote and the lack of clarity which you wrote it, then I find what you posted almost slanderous against Intel and perhaps with good reason.

It founds like you sent them information unsolicited without any legal standing with them and yet expected some sort of legal protection? Unsolicited information is about as close to public domain as you can get so if they forwarded information, why be surprised. How would they even know who your competitor was. Perhaps they were trying to do you a favour by pointing your technology towards a company that may be interested in licensing and manufacturing it?

If you feel that patent attorneys are not worth their money due to them not giving you the answers you want, then perhaps you need to consider what your expectations are? I would much rather invite and have someone expert in the system help with write great patents versus trust myself in something I am not an expert on, but that is just me.

Stuart2121
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Rookie
Re: INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Stuart2121   8/19/2014 12:37:40 PM
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"slander noun - a false spoken statement damaging to a person's reputation.

verb make false and damaging statements about someone"

Actually it would be libel, if it were - published vs spoken.

One would only need to show that what was said was true to defend a charge of slander or libel.

It may be that Intel agree with me that they can't be trusted - I have been posting the above for 4 -5 years now, with an invitation for them to provide any evidence to the contrary. If my phone doesn't ring, I know it's them not calling to apologise - again.

Tell me, Jack, what would you do if your CPUs were melting, and an inventor contacted you with an offer to solve your problem?

Jack.L
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CEO
Re: INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Jack.L   8/20/2014 4:16:17 PM
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Stuart,

While Intel processors are hot, obviously they are not "melting" in commercial products. Yes heat management is an issue and yes better heat sinking can be translated into better performance.

I am sure you believe that your design is 3x better than anything else and perhaps it is, but odds are it is not. No doubt there are many many inventors in your space who believe the same thing. I have been around technology for ... well too many decades now and the number of times I have had a better mousetrap promoted to me that was not really, I have lost count. 

No doubt Intel gets tons of unsolicited technology offers as yours appears to be.

If I truly had a ground breaking technology I would:

- Ensure my patent protection was in order

- Ensure I have a plan in place to bring it to market

- Network, work the phone, whatever it took to get a meeting with as close to the right person at Intel (if that was to be my lead customer) as possible such that my idea gets the proper attention, not just gets lumped in with the other mouse traps.

I would not send any material unsolicited without any prior contact and if I did, I would not have any expectation of confidentiality as I had not establshed any.

 

If I received unsolicited sales material (and I receive a lot), most of the time I would delete it, and if something interesting caught my eye, I would probably ask people I know associated with similar technology if they had seen anything like it and to comment on validity.

 

Stuart2121
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Rookie
Re: INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Stuart2121   8/21/2014 10:32:27 PM
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Thanks for your reply Jack, I will address it over the weekend.

In the meantime, I am intrigued that you seem to 'know' that it must be the inventor at fault. 

I would be interested to know how you came by that insight?

Stuart2121
User Rank
Rookie
Re: INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Stuart2121   8/27/2014 10:14:36 AM
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"Stuart,

While Intel processors are hot, obviously they are not "melting" in commercial products. Yes heat management is an issue and yes better heat sinking can be translated into better performance."

Jack, if you Google the quote in my OP, you will find it gets at least two hits in major media, & one is still online. 

I am sure you believe that your design is 3x better than anything else and perhaps it is, but odds are it is not.  

That is correct; however I have been inventing for many years, I have confidence in my designs. My record is not too shabby. You may care to Google "Local inventor wins 3 prestigious awards"

No doubt there are many many inventors in your space who believe the same thing. I have been around technology for ... well too many decades now and the number of times I have had a better mousetrap promoted to me that was not really, I have lost count.  

I have measured the performance of my hand built prototype, & checked it against the best others, as listed on the only website to provide a true figure of merit for performance (∆T, in ˙C/W) for their coolers tested. The best commercially available non exotic (no heat pipes, peltiers etc) on their website showed 0.44˚C/W; my cooler test produced a figure of 0.167˚C/W. 

No doubt Intel gets tons of unsolicited technology offers as yours appears to be.

If I truly had a ground breaking technology I would:

- Ensure my patent protection was in order

- Ensure I have a plan in place to bring it to market

- Network, work the phone, whatever it took to get a meeting with as close to the right person at Intel (if that was to be my lead customer) as possible such that my idea gets the proper attention, not just gets lumped in with the other mouse traps.

 I went to the annual conference in Boston & met many in the industry, including an Asian American gentleman who was said to be Intels' Senior Thermal Scientist. We exchanged cards and I subsequently sent to him at Intel some non specific information about my cooler, such as performance. This was with a view to working with them in one way or the other, to solve their 'melting' problem.

I found that this information was almost immediately communicated to my competitor, without reference to me. 

I would not send any material unsolicited without any prior contact and if I did, I would not have any expectation of confidentiality as I had not establshed any. 

If I received unsolicited sales material (and I receive a lot), most of the time I would delete it, and if something interesting caught my eye, I would probably ask people I know associated with similar technology if they had seen anything like it and to comment on validity.

Unsolicited, yes, but not without prior contact. Also, one does not fly to the other side of the planet on a hunch. 

Still keen to hear, Jack, how it is patently obvious to you that the problem will be the inventor.

Stuart.

Stuart2121
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Rookie
Re: INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Stuart2121   9/11/2014 8:29:29 AM
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Did you die, Jack? Sorry to hear about that.

I hope it wasn't from anything serious.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Max The Magnificent   9/11/2014 10:40:21 AM
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@Stuart: If my phone doesn't ring, I know it's them not calling to apologise - again.

LOL

Hey -- it could be me not calling -- how can you tell us apart?

Stuart2121
User Rank
Rookie
Re: INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Stuart2121   9/11/2014 10:43:50 AM
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Are you saying I have to start posting 'Inventors - do not trust Max the Magnificent' ?

Max The Magnificent
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Blogger
Re: INVENTORS - DO NOT TRUST INTEL!!!
Max The Magnificent   9/11/2014 11:39:29 AM
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@Stuart: Are you saying I have to start posting 'Inventors - do not trust Max the Magnificent' ?

Of course not -- you'd be a laughing stock -- everybody trusts Max the Magnificent (that's one of the things that makes me so magnificent in the first place LOL)



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