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GroovyGeek
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CEO
Re: SRAM size
GroovyGeek   8/12/2014 3:35:35 AM
Yes head to head comparisons are tough, but in this case Intel is not showing a PowerPoint but an actual product. TSMC will not ship anything they define as 14nm for at least a year, and in volume even later. Historically their SHIPPING SRAM sizes have been 10-20% larger than what has been advertised in papers, probably to meet SNM and other requirements.

buprestid
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Freelancer
Re: SRAM size
buprestid   8/12/2014 3:21:26 AM
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For these process parameters is there anyway to compare actual numbers? Just some conference papers and some slides here and there.


Intel comes out with the Gate Pitch x Metal Pitch in November 2013 that says they are much better.

TSMC rebuts that claim saying they are equal density at 16nm node.

Intel reiterates again from the chart here they have a denser far cheaper process.

alex_m1
User Rank
CEO
cost
alex_m1   8/11/2014 11:12:35 PM
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I wonder how can Intel reduce transistor costs while the rest of the industry cannot ? what's different ?

GroovyGeek
User Rank
CEO
Re: SRAM size
GroovyGeek   8/11/2014 9:37:14 PM
Buprestid You do realize you are comparing a shipping product to a conference paper presentation. Real SRAM cell sizes are substantially larger than what is advertised at conferences. I guess in a few years wwhen they get aroundto sshipping 14nm we will know.

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Re: Moore's law
rick merritt   8/11/2014 9:34:26 PM
@3D Guy: As Moore himeself said, before scaling stops it will slow down

 

resistion
User Rank
CEO
scalable to 10 nm
resistion   8/11/2014 9:03:39 PM
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The same SADP techniques can scale to 10 nm, but tighter gate scaling looks dangerous.

buprestid
User Rank
Freelancer
SRAM size
buprestid   8/11/2014 8:21:08 PM
Not bad for the SRAM size.

Intel : 0.0588 sq. um

Samsung : 0.064 sq. um ISSCC 2014

TSMC : 0.07 sq. um IEDM 2013

 

3D Guy
User Rank
Manager
Moore's law
3D Guy   8/11/2014 6:22:27 PM
NO RATINGS
Congratulations to the Intel team on a phenomenal engineering achievement. Keeping the cost per transistor going down by doing higher aspect ratio fins, boosting drive current and lowering transistor area needed is great.

I wonder, though, whether Intel can really boast that Moore's Law is alive and well... the yield challenge of high aspect ratio fins cost a year of delays (thereby the cost per transistor went down by 2x after 3 years instead of 2)... it also caused loss of face for Intel with major customers like Apple. 

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