Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
DougInRB
User Rank
Author
Re: Intel uses ARM?
DougInRB   8/15/2014 2:35:12 PM
NO RATINGS
Take a look at the Axxia documentation.  The CPU cores are not the secret sauce.

 

sranje
User Rank
Author
Servers? - or Network Infrastructure!
sranje   8/15/2014 1:51:02 PM
NO RATINGS
Nowhere in pertinent quotations in the article servers were mentioned. The title appears to be misleading

tb100
User Rank
Author
Agere
tb100   8/14/2014 9:35:09 PM
NO RATINGS
Here's a bit of ancient history: this group all started out as Agere (which was a spinoff of Lucent, which, in turn, was a spinoff of AT&T). Do you remember the Agere Orca FPGA? That is now part of Lattice.

http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1263445

tb100
User Rank
Author
Network processors
tb100   8/14/2014 9:09:44 PM
NO RATINGS
This division makes network processors, similar to EZ-chip. Intel has always been in the Ethernet switch chip business, especially after buying Fulcrum, and they had their own family of XScale network processors. They sold part of this family, the PXA to Marvell in 2006, but they still own the rest of the family.

I think XScale is actually based on ARM, believe it or not.  Intel has been making ARM processors longer than almost anyone! certainly long before Qualcomm, TI, or Samsung.

So maybe this purchase of LSI/Avago's Axxia ARM based network processor division is a way to enhance and extend the Xscale family.

 

JimMcGregor
User Rank
Author
Re: Analyst view
JimMcGregor   8/14/2014 8:07:07 PM
NO RATINGS
This still seems like a bit of a stretch for Intel. I find it hard to believe that they would just acquire the group for the relationships. I'm sure the IP will be of some value, but this may also mark a change in Intel's CPU core strategy for certain market segments. It will be interesting to see what becomes of the product family.

Jessica Lipsky
User Rank
Author
Analyst view
Jessica Lipsky   8/14/2014 5:19:32 PM
NO RATINGS
From Jag Bolaria, senior analyst at the Linley Group:

It's not quite clear what Intel is really getting from this deal, but the company's acquisitions haven't historically resulted in huge returns. It will be difficult, but the company will have to be better about integreating LSI and wireless infrastructure into its wireless business.

"LSI was transitioning from Power to 32 bit ARM cores. And now the market is all shifting to 64 bit," Bolaria said, adding that LSI's value is in a modular architecture and complete SoC. "It would be  logical for Intel to put in its own Atom cores. They've been trying to get into virtual architecture with x86...but haven't made a big bang in it yet."

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Re: Intel uses ARM?
rick merritt   8/14/2014 5:17:29 PM
NO RATINGS
@Jessica: I would think it would be hard work upgrading the design to one based on x86 cores. I'm mising somethig here...anyone grok the technical implications of this deal?

Jessica Lipsky
User Rank
Author
Re: Intel uses ARM?
Jessica Lipsky   8/14/2014 3:46:06 PM
NO RATINGS
@Rick, do you think there's any chance Intel may replace the ARM cores and just focus on the relationships LSI developed in networking? 

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
Intel uses ARM?
rick merritt   8/14/2014 1:05:04 PM
NO RATINGS
So why is Intel buying an SoC based on ARM cores and buses LSI co-developed with ARM?

Is this a measure of how ISA agnostic Brian Krzanich is?



Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Radio
NEXT UPCOMING BROADCAST

What are the engineering and design challenges in creating successful IoT devices? These devices are usually small, resource-constrained electronics designed to sense, collect, send, and/or interpret data. Some of the devices need to be smart enough to act upon data in real time, 24/7. Are the design challenges the same as with embedded systems, but with a little developer- and IT-skills added in? What do engineers need to know? Rick Merritt talks with two experts about the tools and best options for designing IoT devices in 2016. Specifically the guests will discuss sensors, security, and lessons from IoT deployments.
Like Us on Facebook
Special Video Section
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
01:34
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
05:27
The LT8602 has two high voltage buck regulators with an ...
05:18
Silego Technology’s highly versatile Mixed-signal GreenPAK ...
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
01:34
Why the multicopter? It has every thing in it. 58 of ...
Security is important in all parts of the IoT chain, ...
Infineon explains their philosophy and why the multicopter ...
The LTC4282 Hot SwapTM controller allows a board to be ...
This video highlights the Zynq® UltraScale+™ MPSoC, and sho...
Homeowners may soon be able to store the energy generated ...
The LTC®6363 is a low power, low noise, fully differential ...
See the Virtex® UltraScale+™ FPGA with 32.75G backplane ...
Vincent Ching, applications engineer at Avago Technologies, ...
The LT®6375 is a unity-gain difference amplifier which ...
The LTC®4015 is a complete synchronous buck controller/ ...
10:35
The LTC®2983 measures a wide variety of temperature sensors ...
The LTC®3886 is a dual PolyPhase DC/DC synchronous ...
The LTC®2348-18 is an 18-bit, low noise 8-channel ...