Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
steveiol
User Rank
Rookie
C does not stand for 100
steveiol   1/15/2016 11:11:55 AM
NO RATINGS
C-PHY took a departure from the D-PHY and M-PHY naming convention. The C doesn't stand for "100 mbps", it stands for "channel limited". As in, it can run over lower quality interconnects (at least compared to what D-PHY or M-PHY would require). This presumably makes it cheaper to implement.

Chris.Loberg
User Rank
Author
Re: "C" does not stand for Camera
Chris.Loberg   9/2/2014 3:14:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Thank you Joe. For clarifying the "C" in CPHY. I was guessing on the naming convention given the heavy focus on CSI/DSI support in this revision to DPHY. I agree with you that CPHY offers great promise to increasing DPHY throughput without hanging more symbol-based overhead on.

JoeS37
User Rank
Author
"C" does not stand for Camera
JoeS37   9/2/2014 12:25:12 PM
NO RATINGS
And if it did, what would "M" in M-phy stand for?

Truth is, these letters are related to symbol rates in MHz - they are Roman numerals!.

D = 500.  the first D-PHY spec in 2009 said HS speed was intended to be 80 to 1000Mb/s. The upper limit has since been raised.

M = 1000. The first HS Gear was 1.248Gb/s (HS-G1A) or 1.4576Gb/s (HS-G1B).  Later specs added HS-G2 and HS-G3  (and stay tuned for HS-G4).

C = 100.  C-PHY is derived from D-PHY (except it doesn't forward a clock, it is embedded) but since it transfers 2.28 bits per symbol the symbol rate for the same data transmission rate can be less than half as much as D-PHY would need.  According to the latest draft C-PHY spec it is "intended to define a solution for a symbol rate range of 80 to 2500 Msps per lane, which is the equivalent of about 182.8 to 5714 Mbps per lane."

It is interesting to note that C-PHY balances the current in 3 wires, does not need an extra pair of wires for clock, and achieves speeds up to M-PHY's HS-G3 but at a symbol rate 1/2.28 of M-PHY's bit rate.  It reuses D-PHY's low speed mode ... I think in some cases C-PHY could be viewed as a substantial improvement over real D-PHY.



Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST

What are the engineering and design challenges in creating successful IoT devices? These devices are usually small, resource-constrained electronics designed to sense, collect, send, and/or interpret data. Some of the devices need to be smart enough to act upon data in real time, 24/7. Specifically the guests will discuss sensors, security, and lessons from IoT deployments.

Brought to you by:

Most Recent Comments
Like Us on Facebook
Special Video Section
The LTC3649 step-down regulator combines key features of a ...
Once the base layer of a design has been taped out, making ...
In this short video we show an LED light demo to ...
The LTC2380-24 is a versatile 24-bit SAR ADC that combines ...
In this short video we show an LED light demo to ...
02:46
Wireless Power enables applications where it is difficult ...
07:41
LEDs are being used in current luxury model automotive ...
With design sizes expected to increase by 5X through 2020, ...
01:48
Linear Technology’s LT8330 and LT8331, two Low Quiescent ...
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
05:27
The LT8602 has two high voltage buck regulators with an ...
05:18
Silego Technology’s highly versatile Mixed-signal GreenPAK ...
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
01:34
Why the multicopter? It has every thing in it. 58 of ...
Security is important in all parts of the IoT chain, ...
Infineon explains their philosophy and why the multicopter ...
The LTC4282 Hot SwapTM controller allows a board to be ...
This video highlights the Zynq® UltraScale+™ MPSoC, and sho...
Homeowners may soon be able to store the energy generated ...