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ccorbj
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Re: Rotating china plates
ccorbj   9/30/2014 11:10:36 AM
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@karl - also a good one. I'll add it to the list

ccorbj
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Re: Rotating china plates
ccorbj   9/30/2014 11:09:28 AM
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@max - As you have probably figured out, I have quite got the reply protocol down yet, but I'm starting to figure it out. Hopeful which reply goes to who, of replies I have posted so far, is apparent from my responses

KarlS01
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Re: Rotating china plates
KarlS01   9/30/2014 11:05:45 AM
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My wife and I were just watching a pan with 2 potatoes and enough water to cover them.

When the heat was turned on, the pan started to rock.  If we held it to stop iit from rocking,

It would start again until it was almost to the boiling polint.


The pan has a supposedly flat bottom and vertical sides(obviously not perfectly flat bottom)

and a handle so is not balanced.

 

Is it because of the electric heating element?

Thanks, Karl

ccorbj
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Re: Rotating china plates
ccorbj   9/30/2014 10:59:59 AM
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Ooh - nice one. Give me a little time :)

ccorbj
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Re: My head is spinning....
ccorbj   9/30/2014 10:58:39 AM
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I can always count on you to keep me honest David. The reason you don't see a double spot is that the deflection due to the dipole momemnt is miniscule compare to the deflection due to the moving charge. The original Stern-Gerlach experiment to measure the dipole momemnt used neutral silver ions to avoid the moving charge deflection completely swamping the dipole deflection.

 

So I confess what I proposed is more of a thought experiment than a realistic experiment. A better example might have used neutrons, but that's a bit further removed from everyday experience

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Rotating china plates
Max The Magnificent   9/30/2014 10:47:57 AM
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@ccorbj: If readers want to send me Physics topics, I will try to oblige!

Well, even though I've read "QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter" by Richard Feynman, I still cannot wrap my brain around how mirrors work -- from simple things like why is the angle of incidence equal to the angle of reflection, all the way up to how the photons "bounce" off the atoms forming the mirror withpout being scattered to the four winds, as it were.

ccorbj
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Re: Rotating china plates
ccorbj   9/30/2014 10:36:58 AM
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Glad to hear it Max. I can do more of these if there is interest. If readers want to send me Physics topics, I will try to oblige!

David Ashton
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Re: Rotating china plates
David Ashton   9/29/2014 4:56:48 PM
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@Max...couldn't quite get my head around that (or that around my head, as the case may be :-) but there is a good video here.

David Ashton
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My head is spinning....
David Ashton   9/29/2014 4:26:34 PM
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@Bernard.... "More exotically, spin is one of the primary mechanisms to create entangled states..."

It's certainly done that with my mind :-)

> "Shoot a beam of electrons through a magnetic field with a gradient, and the beam will bend thanks to the influence of the field on a moving charge. Furthermore, it will also split into two sub-beams....."

The first part of that is fair enough - it's how the old CRT oscilloscopes and TVs used to work.  But splitting into 2 sub-beams - how come that does not cause a double spot on your scope?

Max The Magnificent
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Rotating china plates
Max The Magnificent   9/29/2014 3:48:28 PM
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@Bernard: Lay a plate flat on your hand, and then rotate it under your arm, over your head, and back down to the original position, all the time keeping the plate flat. If you watch carefully, you will notice that you rotated the plate through 720 degrees.



I LOVE this example.

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