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LarryM99
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Re: Fan with a board attached
LarryM99   11/19/2014 3:48:05 PM
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@mhrackin, thanks for the offer, but I tend to feel nostalgia for things like that for about 5 seconds at a time at most. I have been cultivating the habit of periodically doing a relatively ruthless cleanout of stuff that was once very useful but whose day has passed. Granted, the periodicity is very uneven and the frequency is lower than it should be, but it does usually discourage me from accumulating stuff that is already out of date.

Thanks anyway... :-)

Larry M.

mhrackin
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Re: Fan with a board attached
mhrackin   11/17/2014 2:32:20 PM
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@larrym: if you're really nostalgic for those, I'm sure I've got MANY of the old T-3 relatively dim (compared to the tiny ones you complain about) stashed away in my basement.  If you're REALLY nostalgic, I KNOW I have quite a few 7-segment LED numeric displays (single-digit of course, mostly MAN-7 or equivalent).

LarryM99
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Re: Fan with a board attached
LarryM99   11/17/2014 1:47:34 PM
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@Max:Next you'll be telling me that there are no flashing LEDs...

It doesn't have the ones that I am used to seeing. Whatever happened to those huge red bulbs? The LEDs on these things can barely even be seen unless they are lit up. The old ones by comparison look like Christmas ornaments now.

Larry M.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Fan with a board attached
Max The Magnificent   11/14/2014 3:45:26 AM
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@Alx: it's usually the fan, by hiding/unhiding the leds, is reposnible for led flashing. Without it they're useless.

All these years and I never knew that LOL

alex_m1
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Re: Fan with a board attached
alex_m1   11/13/2014 4:33:55 PM
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@Max : it's usually the fan, by hiding/unhiding the leds, is reposnible for led flashing. Without it they're useless.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Fan with a board attached
Max The Magnificent   11/13/2014 2:15:04 PM
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@Larry: It doesn't come with that nifty fan, though...

Next you'll be telling me that there are no flashing LEDs...

LarryM99
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Re: Fan with a board attached
LarryM99   11/13/2014 2:01:42 PM
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@Max, I am not quite sure what that application description means, but it sounds like there is a lot of sensor integration. Most of that is being handled in the ARM world by smart sensors, and at one time the ARMs were underpowered for that sort of thing, but not so much anymore. I would be curious to see some side-by-side benchmarks.

Larry M.

LarryM99
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Re: Fan with a board attached
LarryM99   11/13/2014 1:57:14 PM
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@alex_m1, I have a Beagleboard Black right now that runs Python apps quite nicely, costs a quarter of what this board does, and is the size of a credit card (well, a credit card that is about half an inch thick). It runs at 1 GHz and has 256 MB of RAM / 4 GB of onboard flash storage. It doesn't come with that nifty fan, though...

(sorry, couldn't resist...)

Setting aside specsmanship for the moment, it does seem like there is a lot of momentum behind ARM-based boards for hobbyists these days. I have to wonder how popular this will be.

Larry M.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: License cost
Max The Magnificent   11/13/2014 3:41:33 AM
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@Fredrik: If you want to use this for serious, low-level development, you also need to pay for the SAGE EDK and JTAG probe.  $299/year for noncommercial use, thousands a year for commercial use.

Good info -- thans for sharing

fredrik.nyman
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License cost
fredrik.nyman   11/12/2014 6:11:28 AM
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If you want to use this for serious, low-level development, you also need to pay for the SAGE EDK and JTAG probe.  $299/year for noncommercial use, thousands a year for commercial use.  

If you just want a small, powerful SBC to run Linux on, an Intel NUC seems like a much better choice.

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