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R_Colin_Johnson
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posted in March 2006

9 items
Materials change yields fast transparent circuits
News & Analysis  
3/27/2006   Post a comment
Portland, Ore. -- A process used to create the world's first inexpensive transparent circuitry based on inorganic materials could enable a new era of electronics. The circuit--a five-inverter ring oscillator cast in amorphous indium gallium oxide--was recently demonstrated here at Oregon State University.

Promising technology pays off
News & Analysis  
3/27/2006   Post a comment
Since netting the 2005 EE Times ACE Award for Most Promising New Technology, Molecular Imprints Inc. has garnered support for its groundbreaking step-and-flash imprint lithography (S-FIL) among its peers, its expanding customer base and its funding sources. It has also pioneered two applications for the technology--solid-state lights and hard disks--and has demonstrated how CMOS chip makers can get to the 32-nanometer node more easily with S-FIL.

Single-molecule nanotube oscillator ripe for CMOS
News & Analysis  
3/27/2006   Post a comment
IBM Corp.'s T.J. Watson Research Center has crafted an experimental IC that uses a single-molecule nanotube as the common transistor channel for five CMOS-like inverters wired as a ring oscillator. The fully integrated device, which reportedly runs 400,000 times faster than the fastest nanotube-based circuits developed at other labs, could serve as a blueprint for integrating nanotube transistors into production CMOS chips.
Sensor-packed bumpers found at car lot near you
News & Analysis  
3/27/2006   Post a comment
The software for self-driving cars, or even for full collision-avoidance systems, may be years away, but the sensors are already here. Today automobiles are studded with sensors from companies like Bosch, Denso, Eaton, Melexis, Mitsubishi, Optek and Osram. Such parts will be the eyes and ears of tomorrow's advanced safety systems.
City driving is next for Darpa
News & Analysis  
3/27/2006   Post a comment
After decades of underachieving, artificial intelligence produced self-driving cars last October, when five autonomous vehicles successfully finished Darpa's Grand Challenge, a 132-mile closed course through open desert (search www.eetimes. com, article ID172301198). In the prior year's race, every entrant had either stalled or crashed within seven miles.
Next-generation vehicles: drivers optional
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3/27/2006   Post a comment
The team behind Stanley, the car that won the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's 2005 autonomous-vehicle race over 132 miles of Nevada desert, is at it again.
Defects dodged at nanoscale
News & Analysis  
3/13/2006   Post a comment
Defects in fabrication and errors during operation will become a fact of life for electronic circuits at the nanoscale. To compensate, researchers are crafting schemes to correct fabrication defects and processing errors on the fly. Georgia Institute of Technology, with funding from Intel Corp., is pioneering probabilistic CMOS to trade off processing errors for cooler running temperatures. And Hewlett-Packard Co. recently demonstrated a chip that uses massive redundancy and automatic recovery t
Models demystify quantum-dot Babel
News & Analysis  
3/6/2006   Post a comment
Portland, Ore. -- Physicists have been predicting that interactions between quantum dots could prove just as dissipative as electronic communications on silicon chips, for the same reason: the randomness of multiple-electron behavior. But a team at Ohio University asserts that, given the appropriate environmental conditions, communications among arrays of semiconducting quantum dots can be coherent.

IBM fellow unrolls blueprint for nano
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3/6/2006   Post a comment
Phaedon Avouris, an IBM fellow and manager of the Nanometer Scale Science and Technology program at IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center, is in the vanguard of experimental and theoretical research into the electrical properties and transport mechanisms of carbon nanotubes and other nanostructures. A comprehensive model of nanotube behavior used by Avouris and colleagues at IBM might serve as a blueprint for the design and fabrication of carbon-nanotube-based electronic devices and circuits. Avou


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