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R_Colin_Johnson
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posted in October 2005

12 items
Nanotubes bend to the task of switching
Product News  
10/31/2005   Post a comment
Cooperating to make an all-nanotube switch, electrical engineers from Cambridge University (England) and Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. have circumvented the nano-to-micro interface.
Flexible displays, e-paper are around the corner
Product News  
10/31/2005   Post a comment
Next year might be dubbed the year of the flexible, as roll-up displays and digital signage made of electronic paper debut.
Photons advance on two fronts
News & Analysis  
10/24/2005   Post a comment
Photons have electron and molecular properties that could be applied to such areas as sensors and fiber optics, recent experiments show.
Lab-on-a-chip prepped to protect drinking water
News & Analysis  
10/24/2005   Post a comment
On Sept. 11, 2001, water resource managers across the United States got a wake-up call.
POWER SOURCES: Battery gets bionic charge
News & Analysis  
10/17/2005   Post a comment
Surgically implanted pacemakers only last for about five years before their nonrechargeable batteries — which draw current of less than a microamp — must be replaced.
Surface-process study reveals transition region
News & Analysis  
10/17/2005   Post a comment
Understanding the surface process called wetting has become essential to the bottom-up assembly of atomically precise semiconductors as well as to the functioning of chips and boards.
Steady pace takes Darpa race
News & Analysis  
10/17/2005   Post a comment
Slow but sure took the $2 million purse in the second Darpa Grand Challenge. Using what its developers called a "tortoise strategy," an autonomous Volkswagen Touareg named Stanley exploited artificial-intelligence techniques to cover 132 miles of Nevada desert in 6 hours and 53 minutes, for an average of just over 19 miles per hour.
Detector senses tiny sample of explosives
News & Analysis  
10/10/2005   Post a comment
While the increased threat from terrorism today has airports X-raying all luggage for weapons, there has been no fast, practical way for security personnel to scan baggage for the presence of bombs. Now, a Purdue University research team claims to have developed a sensor that is fast enough to detect tiny amounts of residue from explosives, using standard mass spectrometers outfitted with a special puff-and-sniff, two-nostril "nose."
U.S. funding MRAM, night-vision sensor research
News & Analysis  
10/5/2005   Post a comment
Seeking to shed more light on focal-plane array technology, the U.S. military is investing in larger arrays and MRAM technology to improve the range of night-vision gear.
Microarrays, labs-on-chip enlist for early avian-virus diagnosis
News & Analysis  
10/3/2005   Post a comment
The scenario makes public-health officials sweat: Avian flu breaks out here in Portland. By day 24, there are 104 dead and 6,414 infected. By day 42, the death toll has risen to 846 or more and the infection level to 33,246. Had the city followed the vaccinate-and-quarantine regimen prescribed by the Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study (Midas), however, just 362 would be dead and 2,564 infected, with 34,559 citizens under quarantine.
Bots prove their fitness as first responders
News & Analysis  
10/3/2005   Post a comment
The first responders surveying the devastation that Hurricane Katrina wrought in Louisiana and Mississippi were not all human.
Flu chips find clues in viral DNA
News & Analysis  
10/3/2005   Post a comment
A robotic inkjetlike nozzle places viral RNA on a microarray to populate it with more than 100 variations — bits and pieces of RNA called markers, that together identify the exact strain of the virus.


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Karen Field

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144 comments
Steve Jobs allegedly got his start by dumpster diving with the Computer Club at Homestead High in the early 1970s.

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