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R_Colin_Johnson
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posted in September 2004

12 items
Low-temp polymer nanotubes foretell plastic circuits
News & Analysis  
9/29/2004   Post a comment
Chemists at Central Michigan University have grown carbon nanotubes at a record-low 175 degrees C using a polymer type known as dendrimers as the substrate.
Lens made of metamaterial focuses sound, not light
News & Analysis  
9/27/2004   Post a comment
Metamaterials reverse the ordinary laws of nature, such as Snell's "right-hand" law for electromagnetism, which states that magnetism curls in the same direction in which the fingers of your right hand curl around a wire when you point with your thumb in the direction of current flow.
Composite metamaterials enable 'perfect lens'
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9/27/2004   Post a comment
Composite metamaterials that exhibit a negative index of refraction are being harnessed to enable a variety of hitherto impossible applications, promising to reduce size and cost while simultaneously increasing accuracy and range.
IBM taps spintronics to reset molecular memories
News & Analysis  
9/20/2004   Post a comment
IBM Corp.'s progress in characterizing the magnetic spin of individual atoms and in flipping them from "up" to "down" could lead to molecular-cascade memories, a new type of memory chip that would pack a bit of data in every atom. IBM Fellow Don Eigler's group at Almaden Research Center (San Jose, Calif.) recently demonstrated IBM's new nanoscale characterization method, dubbed "spin-flip spectroscopy."
Yale team builds chips for quantum computing
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9/20/2004   Post a comment
Demonstrating a new paradigm for quantum computing, Yale University researchers have built what they call QED integrated circuits to manipulate quantum bits.
Tuned radio frequency oscillator built from nanotubes
News & Analysis  
9/20/2004   Post a comment
Researchers at Cornell University have created the world's smallest mechanical oscillator that is capable of being tuned electrically. The nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS), which might be a forerunner of sensors that can detect individual atoms, stretches a 1-nanometer-diameter nanotube across a 1,500-nm-wide trench. The system creates a guitar-stringlike device that could also be used as a mechanical RF oscillator or as a clock reference in future nanoscale chips.
Thermal dip pens read, write, repair nanostructures
News & Analysis  
9/13/2004   Post a comment
Portland, Ore. - Creating ultratiny, nanoscale systems is often easier than verifying the accuracy of the resulting structures. Indeed, in some instances the structures can actually be lost. Nanoscale techniques produce minute features, but imaging tools are sometimes too crude to spot breaks in them. To the rescue come atomic-force microscopy and now its interactive "can-do" sibling, thermal dip pen nanolithography.
Self-assembly technique enables 10-nm litho
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9/13/2004   Post a comment
A novel processing technique that combines known molecules to realize a new class of synthesized material has enabled 10-nanometer precision lithography.
Quantum chip circuitry demonstrated
News & Analysis  
9/10/2004   Post a comment
Yale University researchers have demonstrated how to build a quantum computer operating on quantum bits, or qubits, which hold a superposition of quantum states.
Researchers demonstrate nanoscale self-assembly
News & Analysis  
9/9/2004   Post a comment
A new processing technique developed by Cornell University researchers promises to usher in lithographic-like self-assembly into single and multidimensional nanoscale structures.
Library of Congress in your pocket
News & Analysis  
9/6/2004   Post a comment
Arrays of 7-nanometer magnetic nickel nanodots, assembled by researchers at the National Science Foundation's Center for Advanced Materials and Smart Structures (CAMSS), aim at a 500x increase in memory density, to 10 trillion bits per square inch.
Nanodots to launch large memories
News & Analysis  
9/3/2004   Post a comment
Arrays of 7-nanometer magnetic nickel nanodots, assembled by researchers at the National Science Foundation's Center for Advanced Materials and Smart Structures (CAMSS), aim at a 500x increase in memory density, to 10 trillion bits per square inch.


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