REGISTER | LOGIN
Breaking News
Blog

Big Brother at the Wheel

View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Terry Moore
User Rank
Author
Consumers don't like loss of privacy, are resigned
Terry Moore   6/11/2015 12:07:53 PM
Audi is responding to consumer data like that from the recent Pew Research report (http://pewrsr.ch/1cNNkX5, NY Times article http://nyti.ms/1dz2Kz2) and articles like "Our 'sense of resignation' about data collection" http://nyti.ms/1cNNQ7E.

I think the sense of resignation is key; it's just like the sense of resignation that causes people to acquiesce in all kinds of abusive systems. 

(Clearly, paying for a service is not the key for maintaining your privacy -- look at Uber's new rules; they charge for the ride *and* they want data about whereever the customer goes. There has to be meaningful competition, or social pressure, before privacy wil be considered by suppliers.) 

If monetizing data is socially permitted, and if monetizing data allows reduction of service charges to the primary users, then there will be two classes of people -- those who must give up their privacy in order to be able to afford to acccess services, and those who can afford to pay to obtain services while maintaining their privacy. 

Audi's pitch can be viewed as offering privacy as a luxury good. Their customers definitely want it (see above); and they can probably afford it.

 

Don Herres
User Rank
Author
Re: Big Brother
Don Herres   6/11/2015 12:04:15 PM
NO RATINGS
@nick_rb  The US, Chinese, Russian and Israeli governments are all happily hacking into each other.  I do not think anything Google, Facebook or others have is secure from them.

fmotta
User Rank
Author
Privacy and social networking - true antipodes
fmotta   6/11/2015 12:03:16 PM
NO RATINGS
From my speculation, what is deemed private by an individual is often affected most by upbringing and social influences.  I feel that the first adopters of sites like Facebook and G+ are the true culprits of what I perceive to be the process of self-invasion.  These early adopters likely went beyond using it themselves and told others (well, Duh!).  Those who lacked the the understanding that ones pirvacy is best managed by themselves.  And, that what they present online will likely reach far beyond the desired scope.  Those who did not have the understanding of the scope to which their data can reach or feel that sharing all their activities is acceptable grew like a virus and privacy is becoming the exception rather than the norm. 

With built-in software controlled microphones cars became another resource for privacy intrusion.  So, now the information can be obtained passively.  Cars are now adding data-plans/WiFi to their toolkit for further accommodating the intrusion so that the data captured by the cameras, OBDII devices, microphones, and sensors can be readily offloaded for abuse.

Big Brother is already in the car for the most part as loggers are present in some vehicles.  Putting 'him' behind the wheel is on the horizon as our society asserts that the governments protect them from themselves.  Protection beyond territory is mostly the responsibility of the individual.  Outsourcing the task of self-protection and you give up more than your freedom. This has been known throughout history and is often represented by "sell swords" hired for protection desire to offer themselves for second or alternate income sources.  This can taint allegiances and protection/privacy may have been entrusted to the wrong person(s).

 

dadeus
User Rank
Author
Re: Sure, privacy is important...
dadeus   6/11/2015 8:36:46 AM
NO RATINGS
The unfortunate reality of life is that you actually only have privacy in your home. Every bit of internet usage is recorded.  Your cell phone usage is logged, and the mic and camera can be accessed remotely without your knowledge. Your credit card usage is logged. Every phone call you make is run through a FBI computer and scanned for red flag words that may cause the call to be recorded for review. If you use a rewards type store card, your purchases are logged. Your image is recorded on survellience cameras constantly, even when you walk past a bank ATM.  The IoT push removes even more privacy and adds the ability to log even more of your daily decisions. Federal agencies need a court order to access phone and internet records, but the criteria for granting a court order has degraded to next to nothing after 9/11. The real issue is who has access to this info and what do they plan to do with it. In the movie Majority Report, Tom Cruise is bombarded by advertising that uses retina or image recognition to identify him as he walks through a public building.    For the most part it boils down to commerce and advertising.  The concept of privacy is a joke.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Author
Re: Sure, privacy is important...
junko.yoshida   6/11/2015 5:17:26 AM
NO RATINGS
@Olaf Bartheine, thanks for chiming in. You are right. It sure does look like people are suddenly waking up to the privacy issues, doesn't it?

But I think that this is a part of the learning process. Consumers aren't engineers. They aren't always logical, and they don't necessarily think about the unintended consequences of sharing their own data on social media or connected devices with service providers.

But thanks to the proliferations of connected devices (including connected cars), the privacy issue is surfacing on consumers' consciousness now -- belatedly -- I think.

I don't think it wise to take their concerns lightly (just because their demand is irrational), and the industry does need to tell the public explicitly, upfront, what they do and what they won't do with the collected data. Transparency is important in winning the consumers' trust.

 

Olaf Barheine
User Rank
Author
Sure, privacy is important...
Olaf Barheine   6/11/2015 4:49:44 AM
NO RATINGS
But, I always wonder why people suddenly are concerned about their privacy in reference to useful automotive applications like eCall when the same people have obviously no problems to share their whole life in the internet and install every qustionable app on their smartphones.

nick_rb
User Rank
Author
Re: Snowden
nick_rb   6/11/2015 3:01:09 AM
NO RATINGS
@ DCH0,

 

The main difference between NSA and Google/Facebook is how those pieces of information are used.

Per Michael Hayden's admission "[The NSA kills] people based on metadata", which is a bit more aggressive than unwanted ads...

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Author
Re: Obsessing over privacy
junko.yoshida   6/11/2015 2:37:06 AM
@Bert, your points are well taken -- as for your example of GM OnStar and the willingness of the people to trade their privacy on social media.

But I do disagree with you on the generalization you made on the Germans vs. the Americans.

While I am fully aware of the danger of making any broad brush comments, I do know, from my own experience of covering the development of e-Passports during 2000's, Germans (and Europeans in general) took far more cautious steps to implement them with security measures in tact, in response to their citizens' protest (they did not want their governments to invade their privacy).

In contrast, the U.S. Homeland Security initially took a much more cavalier approach by disabling the encyrption function (so that they can process the boarder control faster). This was, however, later altered after the protest of ACLU and other people's protest.

I know this because EE Times was first to break the story on e-passport's security flaw.

http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1151080

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Author
Re: Snowden
junko.yoshida   6/11/2015 2:26:04 AM
NO RATINGS
@DCH0, thanks. My bad. It's fixed now.

Bert22306
User Rank
Author
Obsessing over privacy
Bert22306   6/10/2015 5:43:55 PM
NO RATINGS
Much of this privacy talk, I have to believe, is a bit like the global warming talk. People say one thing, and do exactly the opposite. It ends up being just talk.

Many GM owners were incensed back in 2008, when GM stopped supporting the OnStar system on cars built before 2005. They cited the "safety" concern. Well, guess what? That OnStar system tracks your every move. That's how they know where you are, in an emergency, or even when giving you directions to your destination. It's been around for what, 19 years now?

Never mind the social networks, constantly keeping track of everyone's interests, birthdays, pics, friends, potential friends, and so forth. People are addicted to this stuff. They'd feel lost without their hundreds of "friends." So it seems evident that people are happy to trade off "privacy" for other things.

However, I would find it more than surprising if Germans were truly more concerned over their privacy than Americans are. I think you're simply seeing corporate CEOs articulating positions that best support their particular line of business. In fact, if we're to generalize here, I'd say that if the government becomes involved in intrusions on people's privacy, Americans would be way faster at demonstrating their libertarian tendencies than Germans would be.

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed