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IBM CEO: Reinventing IBM's Profit Stream

Watson, partners generate revenue for behemoth
2/17/2016 10:25 AM EST
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chuckcintron
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chuckcintron   2/22/2016 8:41:40 AM
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Fourth paragraph from the end.  I think you meant "enumerate", not "innumerate".  Unless you really think the CEO of IBM lacks basic math skills ;-)

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: and long term?
R_Colin_Johnson   2/18/2016 1:59:20 PM
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Don't get me wrong, Google's has lots of valuable data and IBM already has access to the Google data in which they are interested (according to the Google representatives at the conference) a relationship which will continue into the future.  IBM also has pre-qualified data streams from industry, smart cities, government agencies, banks, financial institutions, academia and on and on. Deep and wide and realtime.

realjjj
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Re: and long term?
realjjj   2/18/2016 1:48:45 PM
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Don't think about consumer data in today's terms and web browsing only.

As i said glasses will have lots of sensors. First, you see everything (360 at some point, night vision also) and hear everything , you 3D map, you identify any and all objects. Then you have many health and some environmental sensors. Google Now's purpose is to get to know the user and provide assistance at any time , in any way possible. Glasses  also offer an always on screen and you can do a lot of things no other device can.So you don't get 1-5 hours of daily usage like on smartphones, the goal is to make that device useful all the time so users keep it on- will take some time but not that long. You can look at a person and use the camera to determine the heartrate and respiratory rate, that's just an example of how much extra data could be collected easily, the world will figure out other creative ways of using the hardware in glasses to measure things. Imagine 3 billion glasses in use at any given time around the world, each able to gather 1000 times more data than today's Gogole Street View car and then add all kind of robots (cars included) and home automation devices. Sure how much access Google will have to that data will depend and ofc IBM and it's partners will try to serve those devices too. The question was  is it enough for IBM to keep it clean and simple and maybe, aren't they just missing opportunities? They have the resources to try anything they can think of, why not do more.

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: and long term?
R_Colin_Johnson   2/18/2016 8:27:58 AM
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Obama might nominate Watson for the Supreme Court (fat chance) but he would still need to be confirmed. Regarding Google/IBM they are already in bed together, but remember Google data is not as good as expert opinions, journals, medical records and transactions--because none of Google's data is qualified--anyone can click on anything and you never know weather the reason was important, trivial or even a mistake.

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: Better spam & virus detection?
R_Colin_Johnson   2/18/2016 8:17:28 AM
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Thanks. See my new story later today regarding Watson and security.

MWagner_MA
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Better spam & virus detection?
MWagner_MA   2/18/2016 7:15:25 AM
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What I haven't heard mentioned in the same story is IBM's current take on computer security.  Can the "Watson" technology aid in reducing the proliferation of network viruses?  (Great article by the way R_Colin

realjjj
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and long term?
realjjj   2/17/2016 8:13:04 PM
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Who collects the most data? Who spends the money? Consumers and later on robots.  Consumers will transition to glasses in ,lets say, up to 10 years. Glasses will replace pretty much all screens, will have lots of sensors, including visual and will make suggestions to the consumer about what to do, what to buy. Sure IBM can try to power some apps but in the end the OS and the big players already in consumer have an advantage. The hardware enabling those glasses is likely to win in robots too since in glasses you have crazy volume and thermal limitations while the OSes are likely to stick. Granted,in robots it would be easier for them (or their partners) to just make a hybrid AI and compete with other solutions but that would be a very lucrative business that includes working robots and everybody will be after that. That's about when human unemployment becomes a much more difficult problem and the economic system changes to... no economic system?

A part of this cognitive market is already starting to go on device. In glasses and robots at least some of it can't take the latency and has to be on device.

Enabling partners is fine but others can do that too while having more leverage. So their technology would need to be vastly supperior or they'll get squeezed out of the biggest data pool. Vastly supperior long term  to Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Alibaba and many others won't be easy. If data is the most important commodity, why leave most of it on the table? Doing that allows others to get much better at it and catch up. How should they protect their business better? They seem unlikely to try to own the hardware or software ecosystem in consumer. They could make some cognitive accelerator and license it to SoC makers for hybrid cognitive computing but that collides with ARM, Qualcomm and others. There might even be a good chance to disrupt in SoC in glasses if others fail to push hard enough to enable the form factor. They could try to control the network, 5G won't be what is needed anyway (lol).I don't like it when folks want to own everything but IBM might need to control more. A notable aspect is the financial upside that entering a new segment can bring. Someone needs to build tens or hundreds of billions of robots, or virtual worlds (for individuals or groups ) where people live forever ( gaming AI and maybe real time media creation would be a good way to start developing this) and so on- opportunities aren't lacking.

OK, so i went a bit too far but it's more fun that way.In short, is it enough to just enable the partners?  Guess , if Trump wins the elections, IBM could try and buy the NSA, why wouldn't that be for sale....


PS: any chance Obama nominates Watson for the Supreme Court - IBM should run an ad asking for that, before Apple or Microsoft do it with Siri or Cortana.

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: IBM Reinvents Itself, Again
R_Colin_Johnson   2/17/2016 5:16:39 PM
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You are so right! Its almost as if you shoud somehow roll the dice and pick rando directions to develop. But of course the smart money gives the explorers a few years to waste their money on dead ends before investing in the winners.

Terry.Bollinger
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Re: IBM Reinvents Itself, Again
Terry.Bollinger   2/17/2016 5:05:59 PM
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What I find delightful and fascinating about this is how it contrasts to IBM's own characterizations of Watson shortly after their success at Jeopardy.

Back then, the technology was so incredibly hardware and human intensive that the way forward was not clear. One IBM person I met, someone very conversant with the technology and how it was created, postulated at that time that "maybe" medical applications would have a high enough profit margin to make Watson technology viable. Watson for making Internet queries easier? Hah hah hee hee giggle giggle, at least back then.

Conversely, this is also pretty much the path that any radically new technology takes when it first launches, such as laying undersea cables, computers ("maybe 11 by the year 2000"), and telephones. The first launch of the new idea is insanely expensive, "obviously" impractical for most uses, and fraught with uncertainty about where it will go in the future.

Then the future arrives, and wow, you discover that what you thought the market was, and what the market that actually develops is, bear almost no resemblance to each other.

Interesting times indeed.

R_Colin_Johnson
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IBM Reinvents Itself, Again
R_Colin_Johnson   2/17/2016 12:57:41 PM
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Over the years, IBM has been lightening fast to reinvent itself at every "business machine" revolution, from typewriters, to mainframes, to minicomputers, to microprocessors, to "the PC" to cloud computing and now SaaS and PaaS. 

IBM may be the biggest computer vendor, but they are also one of the fastest at reinventing itself to keep abreast of the needs of out time. Currently, Obama's favorite CEO, Ginni Rometty, is redefining IBM as the cognitive computing company that enables its partner to make the money (with IBM of course getting its cut for use of Watson and their hybrid cloud services.

 

 

 

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