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'French Steve Jobs' & His Teacherless School

Slideshow: Tour of Coding School 42 in Paris
5/25/2016 09:00 PM EDT
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Steam Kid
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Re: No books? mmm....
Steam Kid   5/31/2016 8:20:46 AM
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Rigid students are ok if they are academically inclined. At least this way students are engaged, and as any teacher could tell you getting a student engaged with a subject is half the battle. Presumably there is testing that is recognised, in order in reach the various levels that are mentioned in the article. One engaged in the subject, I imagine a student will push themselves to read up on any related field and make notes, just think how people push themselves with hobbies that are not related to their daily job.

JamesM951
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Putting his money where his mouth is
JamesM951   5/28/2016 2:10:42 PM
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I'm impressed. The guy is taking an aggressive new approach to software & education and funding it himself, although I'm sure he will be able to scarf up a few mil from the big valley companies.  I hope his students succeed. 

For everyone worried about engineering, the students will be building on top of some stack so there won't be any more flaws than is typical. The foundation stuff will still be implemented by traditional big company software engineers. 

tb100
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Re: Where is the Engineering?
tb100   5/27/2016 5:06:49 PM
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There's a big difference from design, implementation, and production. 

Explaining it from an electrical engineering point of view (because that's my experience), when you implement a design and produce it, you definitely need a well defined process for analyzing the design and testing the implementation and the manufactured product.

But the design stage itself involves a lot of creativity and you have to be careful to avoid as much process as possible during this phase. When someone says: "Your task is to design our customer system using Ruby on Rails tied into xyz database", the correct design solution may be to throw out those requirements and take a completely different approach. (I think Facebook went through this, where they threw everything out and started from scratch to create a more managable and scalable system).

If you want your product to be unique and highly desireable in the market, you often have to do things differently than anyone has done before, and too many 'processes' in the design phase just get in the way.

dt_hayden
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Re: Where is the Engineering?
dt_hayden   5/27/2016 3:15:49 PM
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Engineering is not always needed, especially when it some to software. 

The tolerance by users of buggy software, the ease of software updating (compared to ROM or even PROM implementations), the abusive EULA contracts, required software maintenance subscriptions, etc all add up to relaxed diligence of software application development.

Any/most real science in computer science is done by academics or a few skilled practitioners anyway.  Most software just needs 'coding' along with creative direction, which a program like this seems to cater to - a more artsy approach.  Any critical software is going to have rigorous development and testing and would probably not be very well aligned with a more artsy approach.

Forcing software students into an engineering program with university accreditation is used to ensure the product (students) meet some minimum level of consistency for the consumers (companies).  A lot of software does not require the backgound of a college education.

I'm sure there is a market for creative technical types, and I would agrue they are harder to find than coders.  That would seem to be a reason for this program to be successful.

 

 

Steve.Heckman
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Re: Where is the Engineering?
Steve.Heckman   5/27/2016 2:17:40 PM
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I agree, this is a difference between a coder/programmer and a software engineer. The nice thing about software it is the one area of engineering that someone can actually learn on their own. 

HankWalker
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Where is the Engineering?
HankWalker   5/27/2016 1:38:25 PM
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In my mind, we will only have reliable software delivered with predictable schedule, cost and functionality if software development is an engineering process. That means the school should be producing engineers, in the same way that CMU Silicon Valley Campus and others have a software engineering curriculum. But there is nothing of that in the description.

MWagner_MA
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No books? mmm....
MWagner_MA   5/26/2016 7:43:24 AM
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sounds like a bit of double-speak.  They don't want "rigid" students unless they think like they do. :-) Peer to peer learning is great, but what if you are working on a project 10years after the class in a subject not worked on recently at 10PM at night - are you going to call someone to figure it out or are you going to go back into a text book or articles you have archived? (you do have a index of app notes too don't you?)  This sounds like a teaching style too far in another direction.  Perhaps somewhere between formal education now and some of what they are proposing is optimal.  You have to give him credit for trying something radically new.

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