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Beating IoT Big Data With Brain Emulation

11/17/2017 00:01 AM EST
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R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: Simon says.
R_Colin_Johnson   11/20/2017 11:21:42 AM
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Yes, this "what we think we are perceiving is actually memories of previous inputs" is most readily apparent (to me) when I see someting (usually in the distance) that I do not recognize. My mind seems to go into "search mode" until I am able to classify it (the usual outcome where my memory of it makes it suddenly clear) or I fail to classify it (when it apears to be this, that, the other thing, then finally forms a new category which is refined the closer I get (the unusual novel outcome that rarely happens).

perl_geek
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Re: Simon says.
perl_geek   11/17/2017 1:28:41 PM
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If you look at the actual data rates of our senses, (firing of nerve impulses, &c.), they aren't terribly high. What we tthink we are perceiving is actually memories of previous inputs, integrated into a single "perception". We really all occupy differnt "imaginary" universes, composed of previous experiences. (I use "imaginary" in quotes, because they had better conform to the important bits of reality if we are to survive very long.) It's pretty close to Plato's Cave.

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: Simon says.
R_Colin_Johnson   11/17/2017 1:04:11 PM
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Yes, everybody is trying to emulate the brain's extraordinary solutions--evolved over millions of years. And Big Data is an almost perfect analogy to what humans have to do every minute of every day dealing with the deluge of streaming sensor data from the eyes, ears, taste buds, nose and skin.

perl_geek
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Simon says.
perl_geek   11/17/2017 12:54:14 PM
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It is surely significant how many areas show the sort of layered architecture Herbert Simon described in "The Sciences of The Artificial".  https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/sciences-artificial This is another.

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: Smarts at Every Level
R_Colin_Johnson   11/17/2017 12:53:55 PM
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>"I'm curious why you (always?) post a comment to your own articles...executive summary" I usually give it a few hours for comments to come in, if they don't I send out the summary and it always gets the conversation rolling.

dt_hayden
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Re: Smarts at Every Level
dt_hayden   11/17/2017 12:21:13 PM
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I'm curious why you (always?) post a comment to your own articles, summarizing what you just said.  I don't think I have ever seen that before.  The closest would be executive summaries, which are typically at the top.

Greg504
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Re: Smarts at Every Level
Greg504   11/17/2017 11:25:19 AM
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And I am never going to ever use any of that.  They don't need my data.

R_Colin_Johnson
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Smarts at Every Level
R_Colin_Johnson   11/17/2017 10:13:03 AM
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Every waking moment, the human brain beats Big Data with a hierarchy of smart processing, such as the outlines and colors sent to the brain stem from the eyes (rather than raw pixels) to the hub of the brain (its white matter that intelligently sorts sensor data then routes it to the right parts of the cortex) to the gray matter of the brain which analyzes the visual summaries sent it to identify objects. Likewise, smart wearables, smart phones, IoTs and cloud analytics need to divide and conquer Big Data with smarts at every level of--from data collection to analytics--according to Bosch, which is building smarts into all of its future sensors, according to Marcelino Gemelli at SEMI's MEMS & Sensor Executive Conference this month.

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