REGISTER | LOGIN
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Phononscattering
User Rank
Author
re: Gate leakage, down and out?
Phononscattering   12/5/2007 10:29:10 PM
NO RATINGS
Also an EOT of 0.39nm with a dielectric thickness of 2.4nm requires an average dielectric constant of the gate stack of 25. This would require a crystalline dielectric without interfacial SiO2 layer. While this is not unheard of, it is typically not possible to achieve sufficient channel mobility in a gate stack like that.

Phononscattering
User Rank
Author
re: Gate leakage, down and out?
Phononscattering   12/5/2007 10:12:26 PM
NO RATINGS
A leakage current of 1e-12 A/cm² is physically impossible with an insulator thickness of 2.4nm. It would required a material with an unrealistically high band gap. There appear to be factual mistakes in the article.

DBTI
User Rank
Author
re: Gate leakage, down and out?
DBTI   12/5/2007 10:02:36 PM
NO RATINGS
10A = 1nm. So 0.39nm = 3.9A, not 390A. This is impressive. If GOI is well controlled this could be a great solution. And I agree that a thinner EOT will improve sub-t leakage as well.

donoman
User Rank
Author
re: Gate leakage, down and out?
donoman   12/5/2007 6:21:13 PM
NO RATINGS
CYI-what are you talking about? Being able to use a thinner EOT helps with gate control (short channel effects) as well as reducing gate leakage. Granted, this article is not impressive with an EOT of 390A but I suggest you don't mislead others with a lopsided view on gate dielectrics. Love, donoman

CYI
User Rank
Author
re: Gate leakage, down and out?
CYI   12/4/2007 10:30:59 PM
NO RATINGS
While it is true that high-k materials will virtually eliminate gate leakage, the use of these materials will not significantly reduce subthreshold leakage which will continue to account for a significant percentage of a chip's total power consumption. At 90nm, leakage power accounts for about 30% of a chip's total power and almost all of the leakage power is due to subthreshold leakage, as opposed to gate leakage. At 65nm, over 50% of a chip's power is due to leakage and about 60-70% is due to subthreshold leakage. At 45nm, gate leakage would have grown to overtake subthreshold leakage. With the use of high-k materials, the threat of gate leakage is tamed. However, subthreshold leakage will continue to be a critical parametric yield-limiting factor at 45nm and beyond.



Like Us on Facebook
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Martin Rowe

Test Tool Finds Ethernet Wiring Errors
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
When my house was renovated several years ago, I had the electrician install network outlets in numerous places, then run the LAN cables to a wiring closet. But he didn't document the ends ...

Martin Rowe

Local Electronics Store Supplies Engineers and Hobbyists
Martin Rowe
5 comments
Rochester, N.Y. — Tucked away in this western New York city known for its optics is Goldcrest Electronics, a local store that's supplied businesses and individuals with electronic ...

Martin Rowe

How to Transform a Technology University (Book Review)
Martin Rowe
1 Comment
The Presiding Genius of the Place by Alison Chisolm. WPI, Worcester, Mass., 234 pp., 2016. Engineers love to discuss, and often criticize, engineering education. They often claim ...

Max Maxfield

Aloha from EEWeb
Max Maxfield
Post a comment
Just a few minutes ago as I pen these words, I posted this blog about this month's Cartoon Punchline Competition over on EEWeb.com.