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chanj0
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re: Toshiba rolls 3-D TVs minus glasses
chanj0   10/5/2010 4:57:05 AM
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If Toshiba is aiming at gaming, why wouldn't it produce a smaller size, like below 10", for the today's popular tablet device?

Sheetal.Pandey
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re: Toshiba rolls 3-D TVs minus glasses
Sheetal.Pandey   10/5/2010 3:21:57 AM
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I agree on the headache concerns with 3D viewing. Hope Toshiba has done some manual tests. But it would definitely be interesting to see their 3d tvs that dont need glasses.

phoenixdave
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re: Toshiba rolls 3-D TVs minus glasses
phoenixdave   10/5/2010 1:37:03 AM
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Have experienced the Panasonic 3D TV with the glasses and was truly amazed. But after a few minutes, I had a headache that took about an hour to go away. Does not seem happen in 3D movies, so no sure what the difference is, but for me it's not at the level where I would be able to do the switch. A non-glasses TV would be nice to try.

selinz
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re: Toshiba rolls 3-D TVs minus glasses
selinz   10/5/2010 1:28:36 AM
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I have to disagree about the special glasses. I think that the ability to "turn off" the 3D effect by removing glasses is a desirable feature. It seems to me that pixel sized alternating polarization filters is the easiest implementation. What IS a non-starter is the lousy implementation that is currently available to transform typical TV's to 3D. I had a superbowl party when Intel supplied free 3D glasses to all through Pepsi (I think, or Coke) channels. We paused when it was time passed out the paper specs to all 40 or so people. It was cool, it worked, but the implementation was very non-ideal. (One darkened eye resulted in a tiring watch after a while). I'm planning on giving the Sony and/or Samsung a hard look this holiday season (my plasma is getting a bit tired).

old account Frank Eory
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re: Toshiba rolls 3-D TVs minus glasses
old account Frank Eory   10/4/2010 9:10:49 PM
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This sounds like a great start, but with sizes of only 12 or 20 inches, we're talking about single-viewer TV sets -- at a pretty hefty price too. Things will start getting really interesting when this technology makes it to more normal TV screen sizes and when the price premium isn't so stratospheric. But I'm glad to see Toshiba take this first step and get this out there. As I've said before, wearing special glasses is a non-starter for the vast majority of consumers.

eryksun
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re: Toshiba rolls 3-D TVs minus glasses
eryksun   10/4/2010 9:04:02 PM
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This YouTube video should answer your questions: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8uUWydvF18I

Robotics Developer
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re: Toshiba rolls 3-D TVs minus glasses
Robotics Developer   10/4/2010 8:16:08 PM
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It sounds very interesting, I would like to have a more fuller explanation of what it does and how it works. I am wondering if the viewing angle is super critical in achieving the full 3D effect? I like the idea of not needing to wear glasses. I found the glasses not comfortable and a little disorienting. We will have to wait and see when it comes out!



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