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Bear1959
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
Bear1959   10/6/2011 3:14:12 PM
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Actually Max, you look more happy now than you did in your young picture. Looks like you may have had a premonition of all the bumps and bruises you would have to go through to arrive to today.

Max The Magnificent
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
Max The Magnificent   10/6/2011 1:43:19 PM
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You little scamp! :-)

Max The Magnificent
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
Max The Magnificent   10/6/2011 1:31:24 PM
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Your comment reminded me of a game called "Mugwumps" ... we should do a column about those old games :-)

Max123
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
Max123   10/6/2011 1:29:24 PM
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Brought back memories of the character based "rogue" game I used to play..

ost0
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
ost0   10/6/2011 7:08:13 AM
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That paper type I believe is called tractor-feed, and it appears you can still buy it (like on http://www.highsecuritypaper.com/home-office-continuous.html). Not long time ago I have seen companies using this paper type with two layers and carbon in between for and dot matrix printer to get a carbon copy. Ascii art also lives on as you can see if you google it. I believe I have some strips of punched tape with 7bit ascii art stacked away, with some nude ladies on ;)

Max The Magnificent
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
Max The Magnificent   10/4/2011 9:22:37 PM
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Thanks for this link -- I just added a copy of this image into the article -- Max

David Ashton
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
David Ashton   10/4/2011 9:19:19 PM
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Texas Instruments produced a dot matrix printer, the TI810, that looked a bit like that (minus the keyboard). Built like a tank, and ultra-reliable. They were favourites in the Airline industry as ticket printers, they could print an 8-ply ticket and the bottom copy would be quite readable. The tickets were fan-fold as well, and loaded from the bottom. They don't build stuff like that these days...

Wnderer
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
Wnderer   10/4/2011 9:09:58 PM
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I was taught Basic in high school on one of these. http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/la36.html

KarlS
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
KarlS   10/4/2011 8:19:55 PM
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Sorry, hit the wrong key-- logic was hand drawn and signal and power wires connections were on punched cards with wiring lists used for build (hand soldered) and engineering changes.

KarlS
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
KarlS   10/4/2011 8:16:17 PM
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The first Automated Logic Diagrams (ALDS) that I worked with in 1963 were printed on the IBM 1403 line printer. It was a chain printer and a special chain was used that had a few "graphics" characters used for line drawing. Yes, the regular fan fold paper was 132 characters wide, but the ALD paper was fed edgewise to allow wider diagrams. Circuit technology was nand, 2 or 3 inputs per module with modules packaged on printed circuit cards that plugged into boards mounted on gates in frames. Engineers drew diagrams and keypunch transcribers keyed card p/n and physical and page location onto punched cards that were inputted into the EDA computer system. Previously the AN/FSQ7/8

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