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reanimator0
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re: Mars Curiosity gets down to science
reanimator0   11/22/2012 9:00:55 AM
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I find this pictures really fascinating. But there is one question, which leaves me no calm: How such "Self portrait" could be physically when only single one (to my knowledge) robot exists on Mars?!

reanimator0
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re: Mars Curiosity gets down to science
reanimator0   11/22/2012 9:03:55 AM
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I find these pictures really fascinating. But there is one question, which leaves me no calm: How such "Self portrait" could be physically taken when only single one (to my knowledge) robot exists on Mars?! It looks like that photo made by standalone observer - no physical contact between camera and robot is visible on this picture.

jdesbonnet
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re: Mars Curiosity gets down to science
jdesbonnet   11/22/2012 11:42:01 PM
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From what I recall: that's taken from a camera on the robot arm. So it's like taking a photo of yourself at arms length.

fracicot
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re: Mars Curiosity gets down to science
fracicot   11/23/2012 5:10:54 PM
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Right, but when you do a self portrait, you always see the arm that holds the camera. I can't see any arm on the photo, like if the camera was floating about or standing on a tripod.

fracicot
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re: Mars Curiosity gets down to science
fracicot   11/23/2012 5:14:51 PM
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Ok, now I understand: this is a mosaic: the arm is not on the final picture, but must be on each single pictures. Cool!

jdesbonnet
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re: Mars Curiosity gets down to science
jdesbonnet   11/22/2012 11:44:35 PM
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Here are the details of the MSL self portrait photo: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia16239.html

Duane Benson
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re: Mars Curiosity gets down to science
Duane Benson   11/24/2012 5:44:56 AM
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I take it that this is more or less like taking two self-portraits; one with the right hand and one from the left, then cutting it apart and stitching together the two sides when each was not holding the camera. It makes for a pretty interesting self-portrait and at first glance doesn't seem possible.

rick merritt
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re: Mars Curiosity gets down to science
rick merritt   11/25/2012 10:07:54 PM
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This is sooo coool. Science and human endeavor at its best. Thanks for the coverage, George, BTW, two lead engineers from Curiosity were on the NPR comedy program "Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me." Not only are they smart, they are funny! http://www.npr.org/programs/wait-wait-dont-tell-me/



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