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Asha Ganesan
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re: Electronics in medicine: Insulin pump design
Asha Ganesan   5/14/2013 6:07:37 PM
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Hi JReyes, Could you provide more details about that device? We are eager to know.

eewiz
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re: Electronics in medicine: Insulin pump design
eewiz   5/13/2013 2:01:23 PM
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interesting... which device is it? curious to know how it measures the blood sugar level? is it based on spectroscopy/imaging techniques?

JReyes
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re: Electronics in medicine: Insulin pump design
JReyes   5/13/2013 12:14:12 PM
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Hi Ewizz, My girlfriend is currently using one of these insulin pumps and there currently is a supplematary device which contunuiously monitors blood glucose level which significantly reduces the need to prick your finger. However, it's still required to test 1-3 times a day to calibrate the glucose monitor in order to relay the correct readings back to the pump. Once the blood sugar levels are sent to the pump, the pump in turn will ask the user to verify the amount of insulin to apply for correction. I think this is interesting on its own. All of this communication is done wirelessly by the way.

eewiz
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re: Electronics in medicine: Insulin pump design
eewiz   5/12/2013 2:20:18 PM
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that one is not the closed loop, I intended. In the link you gave the user still needs to prick the finger/skin to get some blood on the strip to measure the glucose level. which is not automated. coming to think of it I realize that a non invasive blood sugar monitoring mechanism is needed for this to work, which mostly doesnt exist.

Asha Ganesan
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re: Electronics in medicine: Insulin pump design
Asha Ganesan   5/12/2013 1:49:09 PM
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Hi eewiz, 1. Yes, it is commercially available (https://www.accu-chekinsulinpumps.com/ipus/). This is for people with severe diabetes risks and who might have to take large dosages. The commercially available products do not have a closed loop system and the rate is adjusted through manual settings. 2. Yes, it is possible to implement a closed-loop system where we can involve the same chip to monitor current blood glucose level and accordingly adjust the flow rate. Here is a link about it:http://www.cypress.com/?rID=43661&source=header. Systems like this haven't yet come out in the medical industry.

eewiz
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re: Electronics in medicine: Insulin pump design
eewiz   5/10/2013 4:32:21 AM
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oh ok.. theres no feedback mechanism to know the current blood sugar level of the patient.. it works as a linear open loop.. which is not impressive. if there was a sensor to detect the current blood sugar level and then push insulin accordingly, that wud have been interesting. For open loop drug delivery other mechanisms like micro needle patches are more convenient.

eewiz
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re: Electronics in medicine: Insulin pump design
eewiz   5/10/2013 4:20:06 AM
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quite interesting.. the only problem is that people need to carry around that device. is it commercially available anywhere?



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