REGISTER | LOGIN
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
jackOfManyTrades
User Rank
Author
Re: Errr?
jackOfManyTrades   11/15/2013 9:28:48 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for your reply (see below!).

jackOfManyTrades
User Rank
Author
Re: Errr?
jackOfManyTrades   11/15/2013 9:27:51 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for your reply. In fact I have used IC testers myself and have written test programs and managed a sub-contractor doing the same thing! I guess what I'd call an IC tester is used to test that the IC has been made right; our ATE is used to check it's been designed right.

MeasurementBlues
User Rank
Author
Re: Errr?
MeasurementBlues   11/14/2013 10:17:54 AM
NO RATINGS
@jack, I tend to think of lanes in more-or-less the same way as Lance, a differential pair that makes up a transmission line. For example, a 100Gbps serial link is made of 4x25Gbps "lanes." Actually, its more like 28Gbps given overhead. In effedct, you have a parallel-serial bus.

MeasurementBlues
User Rank
Author
Re: Errr?
MeasurementBlues   11/14/2013 10:14:18 AM
NO RATINGS
@Jack, When I was editor of Test & Measurement World (print), I ran across the same thing. ATE means different things to different people, as we see here. At T&MW, we referred to ATE as those "big iron" testers similar to Lance's definition. But yes, I often ran into people whose definition of ATE was a bunch of instruments controlled by a PC, as you've stated.

ATE as we defined it at T&MW was usually used for testing ICs, often digital such as memory and processors.

The military uses many test stations for functionl testing where the station is made of instruments (box and modular) controlled by a PC. But, they are often called ATE. In writing about military test, I could never use ATE because our copy editors would tell me that's wrong according to our definitions.

At the time, we had two technical editors. I covered test stations according to your definition and the other editor covered ATE per Lance's definition. But then, we shared attending Autotestcon, which is all about military automated functional test, not IC test. I never understood why.

 

Lance A Jones
User Rank
Author
Re: Errr?
Lance A Jones   11/13/2013 11:23:26 AM
NO RATINGS
Lanes are simply P/N pairs of a transmitter, reciever or transciever or the chip itself. The article is really about the load board, system board, or evaluation board design and interface, not the actual ATE itself. Ballout is the pin out of the device(IC) you are trying to test, if you are testing a board or a subassembly this would not apply. High speed test of IC's themselves can't have IC's soldered to boards. These chips are being tested before they go into further assemblies. Certainly if you are performing board, subassembly or system level testing you would have the parts already assembled to the board instead of using a socket. The ATE's being refered o here are really what we call the semiconductor testers from companies like Advantest, Verigy, LTX, etc. It could also be a rack and stack test setup, but still targeted at the IC. 

jackOfManyTrades
User Rank
Author
Errr?
jackOfManyTrades   10/25/2013 2:59:03 AM
NO RATINGS
Testing our ICs using ATE is very important to our business and it always takes forever to run. So, I thought, an article about high-speed ATE looks interesting...

So, let's start with some of the easier and more obvious requirements...

- lanes? PN pairs? what?

- ballout?

- we find ICs perform better when they're soldered to PCBs rather than in sockets

- err...

To me ATE is a load of testgear controlled by software running on a PC. Lanes and ballout (whatever they are) don't come into it. Isn't it amazing how different two people's interpretation of something can be?



Like Us on Facebook
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Martin Rowe

Test Tool Finds Ethernet Wiring Errors
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
When my house was renovated several years ago, I had the electrician install network outlets in numerous places, then run the LAN cables to a wiring closet. But he didn't document the ends ...

Martin Rowe

Local Electronics Store Supplies Engineers and Hobbyists
Martin Rowe
5 comments
Rochester, N.Y. — Tucked away in this western New York city known for its optics is Goldcrest Electronics, a local store that's supplied businesses and individuals with electronic ...

Martin Rowe

How to Transform a Technology University (Book Review)
Martin Rowe
1 Comment
The Presiding Genius of the Place by Alison Chisolm. WPI, Worcester, Mass., 234 pp., 2016. Engineers love to discuss, and often criticize, engineering education. They often claim ...

Max Maxfield

Aloha from EEWeb
Max Maxfield
Post a comment
Just a few minutes ago as I pen these words, I posted this blog about this month's Cartoon Punchline Competition over on EEWeb.com.