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DrFPGA
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Re: Ah well at least no one died
DrFPGA   5/22/2014 3:28:39 PM
No reports yet doesn't mean no-one died. let's wait and see what the lawyers come up with. Can you spell deep pockets?

jnissen
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Re: Ah well at least no one died
jnissen   5/22/2014 3:01:43 PM
I find this hilarious. Google just paid through this nose to get this company and now a basic feature of the device is considered a flaw. When I first read the specs and saw the video on how to use the device I laughed out loud. What would keep it from shutting down when your four year old goes twirling across the floor underneath the device? Bad product design is bad product design. No marketing BS can overcome that. Goggle purchased a big smoking pile of dung. Not the first waste of money for them and surely not the last. I can only hope I'm on the receiving end of their idiotic purchase plans. 

betajet
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Re: Ah well at least no one died
betajet   5/22/2014 2:39:47 PM
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AZskibum wrote: The beauty of a connected device...

Yeah, kind of like when Amazon deleted copies of Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four from customers' Kindles in an attempt to win the 2009 Irony of the Year award.

I guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder :-)

AZskibum
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Re: Ah well at least no one died
AZskibum   5/22/2014 12:37:25 PM
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The beauty of a connected device is that the problematic feature can be disabled by a remote software update without requiring the user to rip the device off the wall and send it back to the manufacturer.

Crusty1
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Ah well at least no one died
Crusty1   5/22/2014 12:01:01 PM
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@Max this would be good to discuss on Friday? It's almost an issue of augmented reality?

I find this information alarming and amusing at the same time.

I have designed and installed fire detection equipment for a great number of years.

The funny thing is that the detector, to get to market, probably had to pass a whole host of EMC tests.

The alarming thing is where was the safety critical assesment tests for usage?

Just from reading the article, it looks like the software teams got thier silence and isolation issues mixed up.

If I designed a software strategy like this then it would only be a silence option and then only for a limited time interval, such as allowing the detector to clear smoke after burning toast. I do not think I would even do a gesture silence for Carbon Monoxide.

 

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